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Identification of new psychoactive substances (NPS) using handheld Raman Spectroscopy employing both 785 and 1064 nm laser sources

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contributor authorGuirguis, Amira
contributor authorGirotto, Sarah
contributor authorBerti, Benedetta
contributor authorStair, Jacqueline
date accessioned2017-05-17T15:12:03Z
date available2017-05-17T15:12:03Z
date issued2017-04-01
identifier citationGuirguis , A , Girotto , S , Berti , B & Stair , J 2017 , ' Identification of new psychoactive substances (NPS) using handheld Raman Spectroscopy employing both 785 and 1064 nm laser sources ' Forensic Science International . DOI: 10.1016/j.forsciint.2017.01.027en
identifier issn0379-0738
identifier otherPURE: 11209925
identifier otherPURE UUID: cb1310f9-32fd-4572-8db4-b62dbcb01a70
identifier urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/18198
descriptionThis document is the Accepted Manuscript version of the following article: Amira Guirguis, Sarah Girotto, Benedetta Berti, and Jacqueline L. Stair, ‘Identification of new psychoactive substances (NPS) using handheld Raman Spectroscopy employing both 785 and 1064 nm laser sources ’, Forensic Science International, published online 4 February 2017, doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.forsciint.2017.01.027. Under embargo. Embargo end date: 4 February 2018. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en
description abstractThe chemical identification of new psychoactive substances (NPS) in the field is challenging due not only to the plethora of substances available, but also as a result of the chemical complexity of products and the chemical similarity of NPS analogues. In this study, handheld Raman spectroscopy and the use of two excitation wavelengths, 785 and 1064 nm, were evaluated for the identification of 60 NPS products. The products contained a range of NPS from classes including the aminoindanes, arylalkylamines, benzodiazepines, and piperidines & pyrrolidines. Identification was initially assessed using the instruments’ in built algorithm (i.e., % HQI) and then further by visual inspection of the Raman spectra. Confirmatory analysis was preformed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry. For the 60 diverse products, an NPS was successfully identified via the algorithm in 11 products (18 %) using the 785 nm source and 29 products (48 %) using the 1064 nm source. Evaluation of the Raman spectra showed that increasing the excitation wavelength from 785 to 1064 nm improved this ‘first pass’ identification primarily due to a significant reduction in fluorescence, which increased S/N of the characteristic peaks of the substance identified. True positive correlations between internet products and NPS signatures ranged from 57.0 to 91.3 % HQI with typical RSDs < 10 %. Tablet formulations and branded products were particularly challenging as a result of low NPS concentration and high chemical complexity, respectively. This study demonstrates the advantage of using a 1064 nm source with handheld Raman spectroscopy for improved ‘first pass’ NPS identification when minimal spectral processing is required, such as when working in field. Future investigations will focus on the use of mixture algorithms, effect of NPS concentration, and further improvement of spectral libraries.en
language isoeng
relation ispartofForensic Science Internationalen
rightsen
titleIdentification of new psychoactive substances (NPS) using handheld Raman Spectroscopy employing both 785 and 1064 nm laser sourcesen
typeArticleen
contributor institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciencesen
contributor institutionDepartment of Pharmacy, Pharmacology and Postgraduate Medicineen
contributor institutionCentre for Clinical Practice, Safe Medicines and Drug Misuse Researchen
contributor institutionCentre for Hazard Detection and Protection Researchen
contributor institutionMedicinal and Analytical Chemistryen
contributor institutionNanopharmaceuticsen
contributor institutionPsychopharmacology, Drug Misuse and Novel Psychoactive Substances Uniten
contributor institutionHealth Services and Clinical Research Centreen
identifier doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.forsciint.2017.01.027
description statusPeer revieweden
date embargoedUntil04-02-20


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