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dc.contributor.authorMemelli, Heraldo
dc.contributor.authorTorben-Nielsen, Ben
dc.contributor.authorKozloski, James
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-08T11:43:33Z
dc.date.available2016-03-08T11:43:33Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationMemelli , H , Torben-Nielsen , B & Kozloski , J 2013 , ' Self-referential forces are sufficient to explain different dendritic morphologies ' , Frontiers in Neuroinformatics , vol. 7 , 1 . https://doi.org/10.3389/fninf.2013.00001
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 9331099
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 1707d1af-cd97-4c81-90a3-1a4b65cdc7ef
dc.identifier.otherPubMed: 23386828
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84886747982
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/16738
dc.description© 2013 Memelli, Torben-Nielsen and Kozloski. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in other forums, provided the original authors and source are credited and subject to any copyright notices concerning any third-party graphics etc
dc.description.abstractDendritic morphology constrains brain activity, as it determines first which neuronal circuits are possible and second which dendritic computations can be performed over a neuron's inputs. It is known that a range of chemical cues can influence the final shape of dendrites during development. Here, we investigate the extent to which self-referential influences, cues generated by the neuron itself, might influence morphology. To this end, we developed a phenomenological model and algorithm to generate virtual morphologies, which are then compared to experimentally reconstructed morphologies. In the model, branching probability follows a Galton-Watson process, while the geometry is determined by "homotypic forces" exerting influence on the direction of random growth in a constrained space. We model three such homotypic forces, namely an inertial force based on membrane stiffness, a soma-oriented tropism, and a force of self-avoidance, as directional biases in the growth algorithm. With computer simulations we explored how each bias shapes neuronal morphologies. We show that based on these principles, we can generate realistic morphologies of several distinct neuronal types. We discuss the extent to which homotypic forces might influence real dendritic morphologies, and speculate about the influence of other environmental cues on neuronal shape and circuitry.en
dc.format.extent12
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Neuroinformatics
dc.rightsOpen
dc.titleSelf-referential forces are sufficient to explain different dendritic morphologiesen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Computer Science
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Computer Science
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Published version
dcterms.dateAccepted2013
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.3389/fninf.2013.00001
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeOpen


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