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dc.contributor.authorPack, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorArvinen-Barrow, Monna
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-01T12:33:45Z
dc.date.available2016-11-01T12:33:45Z
dc.date.issued2017-09-25
dc.identifier.citationSasha Kelly 2017 , ' “I Think I Became a Swimmer Rather than Just Someone with a Disability Swimming Up and Down”: Paralympic Athletes Perceptions of Self and Identity Development ' Disability and Rehabilitation , vol. 39 , no. 20 , pp. 2063-2070 . https://doi.org/10.1080/09638288.2016.1217074
dc.identifier.issn1464-5165
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 10164192
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: f7e2cf7f-a557-4211-98c8-c88d5bf91202
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84988736442
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/17287
dc.descriptionThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in Disability and Rehabilitation on 27 September 2016, available online at:DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/09638288.2016.1217074.
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the role of swimming on Paralympic athletes’ perceptions of self and identity development. Method: A hermeneutic phenomenological approach was taken. During semi-structured interviews five Paralympic swimmers (aged 20-24 years) were asked questions about their swimming career, perceptions of self, integration, and impairment. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Results: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis1 yielded three superordinate themes: a) ‘One of the crowd’; none of the participants viewed themselves as disabled, nor as supercrips; these perceptions stemmed from family-, school-, and swimming- related experiences, b) ‘Becoming me’; participation in swimming facilitated self- and social-acceptance, and identity development, and c) ‘A badge of honour’; swimming presented opportunity to present and reinforce a positive identity. Conclusions: Swimming experiences enabled the participants to enhance personal and social identities, integrate through pro-social mechanisms, and to develop a career path following retirement from competition.through pro-social mechanisms, and to develop a career path following retirement from competition.en
dc.format.extent8
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofDisability and Rehabilitation
dc.rights/dk/atira/pure/core/openaccesspermission/embargoed
dc.subjectparalympic sport
dc.subjectlived experiences
dc.subjectcongenital disability
dc.subjectqualitative research
dc.title“I Think I Became a Swimmer Rather than Just Someone with a Disability Swimming Up and Down”: Paralympic Athletes Perceptions of Self and Identity Developmenten
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology and Sports Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Research in Psychology and Sport Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionMovement
dc.contributor.institutionSport, Health and Exercise
dc.contributor.institutionSports and Exercise Psychology
dc.contributor.institutionHealth and Wellbeing
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.date.embargoedUntil2017-09-27
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Accepted Version
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-07-21
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1080/09638288.2016.1217074
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-09-27+01:00
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.date.embargo2017-09-27+01:00
herts.rights.accesstypeopenAccess


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