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dc.contributor.authorZamuner, Tania S.
dc.contributor.authorStrahm, Stephanie
dc.contributor.authorMorin-Lessard, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorPage, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-16T00:14:09Z
dc.date.available2018-08-16T00:14:09Z
dc.date.issued2017-11-15
dc.identifier.citationZamuner , T S , Strahm , S , Morin-Lessard , E & Page , M 2017 , ' Reverse production effect: Children recognize novel words better when they are heard rather than produced ' , Developmental Science . https://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12636
dc.identifier.issn1363-755X
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 12488192
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 1e3c89e0-0bb7-43e3-a9d4-5903837b7d64
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85034223072
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/20400
dc.descriptionThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Tania S. Zamuner, Stephanie Strahm, Elizabeth Morin-Lessard, and Michael P. A. Page, 'Reverse production effect: children recognize novel words better when they are heard rather than produced', Developmental Science, which has been published in final form at DOI 10.1111/desc.12636. Under embargo until 15 November 2018. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
dc.description.abstractThis research investigates the effect of production on 4.5- to 6-year-old children’s recognition of newly learned words. In Experiment 1, children were taught four novel words in a produced or heard training condition during a brief training phase. In Experiment 2, children were taught eight novel words, and this time training condition was in a blocked design. Immediately after training, children were tested on their recognition of the trained novel words using a preferential looking paradigm. In both experiments, children recognized novel words that were produced and heard during training, but demonstrated better recognition for items that were heard. These findings are opposite to previous results reported in the literature with adults and children. Our results show that benefits of speech production for word learning are dependent on factors such as task complexity and the developmental stage of the learner.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofDevelopmental Science
dc.rightsEmbargoed
dc.titleReverse production effect: Children recognize novel words better when they are heard rather than produceden
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology and Sports Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Research in Psychology and Sport Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionPsychology
dc.contributor.institutionLearning, Memory and Thinking
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.date.embargoedUntil2018-11-15
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Accepted Version
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-11-15
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1111/desc.12636
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-11-15
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.date.embargo2018-11-15
herts.rights.accesstypeEmbargoed


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