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dc.contributor.authorPine, K.
dc.contributor.authorGurney, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorFletcher, Ben
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-26T10:09:01Z
dc.date.available2010-10-26T10:09:01Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationPine , K , Gurney , D & Fletcher , B 2010 , ' The semantic specificity hypothesis : when gestures do not depend upon the presence of a listener ' , Journal of Nonverbal Behavior , vol. 34 , no. 3 , pp. 169-178 . https://doi.org/10.1007/s10919-010-0089-7
dc.identifier.issn0191-5886
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 194228
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 2b91dee9-38fb-44a5-81d0-4ca54f32a098
dc.identifier.otherdspace: 2299/4920
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 77954459787
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/4920
dc.description“The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com”.
dc.description.abstractHumans gesture even when their gestures can serve no communicative function (e.g., when the listener cannot see them). This study explores the intrapersonal function of gestures, and the semantic content of the speech they accompany. Sixty-eight adults participated in pairs, communicating on an object description task. Visibility of partner was manipulated; participants completed half the task behind a screen. Participants produced iconic gestures significantly more for praxic items (i.e., items with physically manipulable properties) than non-praxic items, regardless of visibility of partner. These findings support the semantic specificity hypothesis, whereby a gesture is integrally associated with the semantic properties of the word it accompanies. Where those semantic properties include a high motor component the likelihood of a gesture being produced is increased, irrespective of communication demands.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Nonverbal Behavior
dc.rightsOpen
dc.titleThe semantic specificity hypothesis : when gestures do not depend upon the presence of a listeneren
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionHealth & Human Sciences Research Institute
dc.contributor.institutionPsychology
dc.contributor.institutionApplied and Practice-based Research
dc.contributor.institutionBehaviour Change in Health and Business
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77954459787&partnerID=8YFLogxK
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dcterms.dateAccepted2010
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1007/s10919-010-0089-7
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeOpen


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