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dc.contributor.authorBloomfield, Linda
dc.contributor.authorKendall, S.
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-14T10:59:46Z
dc.date.available2013-03-14T10:59:46Z
dc.date.issued2012-10
dc.identifier.citationBloomfield , L & Kendall , S 2012 , ' Parenting self-efficacy, parenting stress and child behaviour before and after a parenting programme. ' , Primary Health Care Research and Development , vol. 13 , no. 4 , pp. 364-372 . https://doi.org/10.1017/S1463423612000060
dc.identifier.issn1463-4236
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 784139
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 4b3f2b49-af99-4e9a-8fcf-95c2e03b1f67
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84875811517
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/10143
dc.description.abstractAim: To explore whether changes in parenting self-efficacy after attending a parenting programme are related to changes in parenting stress and child behaviour. Background: Adverse parenting is a risk factor in the development of a range of health and behavioural problems in childhood and is predictive of poor adult outcomes. Strategies for supporting parents are recognised as an effective way to improve the health, well-being and development of children. Parenting is influenced by many factors including the behaviour and characteristics of the child, the health and psychological well-being of the parent and the contextual influences of stress and support. Parenting difficulties are a major source of stress for parents, and parenting self-efficacy has been shown to be an important buffer against parenting stress. Methods: In all, 63 parents who had a child under the age of 10 years took part in the research. Of those, 58 returned completed measures of parenting self-efficacy, parenting stress and child behaviour at the start of a parenting programme and 37 at three-month follow-up. Findings: Improvements in parenting self-efficacy and parenting stress were found at follow-up, but there was less evidence for improvements in child behaviour. The findings clearly suggest a relationship between parenting self-efficacy and parenting stress; parents who are feeling less efficacious experience higher levels of stress, whereas greater parenting self-efficacy is related to less stress. This study adds to the evidence that parent outcomes may be a more reliable measure of programme effectiveness than child outcomes at least in the short term.en
dc.format.extent8
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofPrimary Health Care Research and Development
dc.rights/dk/atira/pure/core/openaccesspermission/open
dc.subjectParenting
dc.subjectself-efficacy
dc.subjectparenting-stress
dc.titleParenting self-efficacy, parenting stress and child behaviour before and after a parenting programme.en
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Adult Nursing and Primary Care
dc.contributor.institutionHealth & Human Sciences Research Institute
dc.contributor.institutionHealth, Young People and Family Lives
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Research in Public Health and Community Care
dc.contributor.institutionNursing, Midwifery and Social Work
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Health and Social Work
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Health and Social Work
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Published version
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1017/S1463423612000060
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeopenAccess


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