Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBird, D. M.
dc.contributor.authorOpperman, Charles H.
dc.contributor.authorDavies, Keith
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-06T07:15:50Z
dc.date.available2013-06-06T07:15:50Z
dc.date.issued2003-09-30
dc.identifier.citationBird , D M , Opperman , C H & Davies , K 2003 , ' Interactions between bacteria and plant-parasitic nematodes : now and then ' , International Journal for Parasitology , vol. 33 , no. 11 , pp. 1269-1276 . https://doi.org/10.1016/S0020-7519(03)00160-7
dc.identifier.issn0020-7519
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 590217
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: b57ca875-af82-4a23-baaf-9b3c7618bc87
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000185796900014
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 0042326079
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/10724
dc.description.abstractBased on genome-to-genome analyses of gene sequences obtained from plant-parasitic, root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.), it seems likely that certain genes have been derived from bacteria by horizontal gene transfer. Strikingly, a common theme underpinning the function of these genes is their apparent direct relationship to the nematodes' parasitic lifestyle. Phylogenetic analyses implicate rhizobacteria as the predominant group of 'gene donor' bacteria. Root-knot nematodes and rhizobia occupy similar niches in the soil and in roots, and thus the opportunity for genetic exchange may be omnipresent. Further, both organisms establish intimate developmental interactions with host plants, and mounting evidence suggests that the mechanisms for these interactions are shared too. We propose that the origin of parasitism in Meloidogyne may have been facilitated by acquisition of genetic material from soil bacteria through horizontal transfer, and that such events represented key steps in speciation of plant-parasitic nematodes. To further understand the mechanisms of horizontal gene transfer, and also to provide experimental tools to manipulate this promising bio-control agent, we have initiated a genomic sequence of the bacterial hyperparasite of plant parasitic nematodes, Pasteuria penetrans. Initial data have established that P. penetrans is closely related to Bacillus spp., to the extent that considerable genome synteny is apparent. Hence, Bacillus serves as a model for Pasteuria, and vice versa. (C) 2003 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en
dc.format.extent8
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal for Parasitology
dc.subjecthorizontal gene transfer
dc.subjectMeloidogyne
dc.subjectPasteuria penetrans
dc.subjectrhizobia
dc.subjectroot-knot nematode
dc.subjectsynteny
dc.subjectROOT-KNOT NEMATODES
dc.subjectPASTEURIA-PENETRANS
dc.subjectBIOLOGICAL-CONTROL
dc.subjectGENE-TRANSFER
dc.subjectBETA-1,4-ENDOGLUCANASE GENES
dc.subjectCYST NEMATODES
dc.subjectEVOLUTION
dc.subjectCLONING
dc.subjectORGANISMS
dc.subjectSYMBIOSIS
dc.titleInteractions between bacteria and plant-parasitic nematodes : now and thenen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Human and Environmental Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionHealth & Human Sciences Research Institute
dc.contributor.institutionGeography, Environment and Agriculture
dc.contributor.institutionCrop and Environmental Protection
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dcterms.dateAccepted2003-09-30
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1016/S0020-7519(03)00160-7
rioxxterms.typeOther
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record