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dc.contributor.authorKaviraj, S.
dc.contributor.authorSilk, J.
dc.contributor.authorEllis, R.S.
dc.contributor.authorCohen, S.
dc.contributor.authorWindhorst, R.A.
dc.contributor.authorPeirani, S.
dc.contributor.authorO'Connell, R.W.
dc.contributor.authorWhitmore, B.C.
dc.contributor.authorRyan Jr., R.E.
dc.contributor.authorHathi, N.P.
dc.contributor.authorDopita, M.A.
dc.contributor.authorFrogel, J.A.
dc.contributor.authorDekel, A.
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-29T11:03:02Z
dc.date.available2013-07-29T11:03:02Z
dc.date.issued2013-01-11
dc.identifier.citationKaviraj , S , Silk , J , Ellis , R S , Cohen , S , Windhorst , R A , Peirani , S , O'Connell , R W , Whitmore , B C , Ryan Jr. , R E , Hathi , N P , Dopita , M A , Frogel , J A & Dekel , A 2013 , ' Newborn spheroids at high redshift : When and how did the dominant, old stars in today's massive galaxies form? ' , Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society , vol. 428 , no. 2 , pp. 925-934 . https://doi.org/10.1093/mnras/sts031
dc.identifier.issn0035-8711
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 2067370
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 924d3e47-5e64-47df-9904-2dc3b38034ee
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84873821311
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-5601-575X/work/77850219
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/11209
dc.description.abstractWe study ~330 massive (M > 10M), newborn spheroidal galaxies (SGs) around the epoch of peak star formation (1 <z <3) to explore the high-redshift origin of SGs and gain insight into when and how the old stellar populations that dominate today's Universe formed. The sample is drawn from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/WFC3 Early-Release Science programme, which provides deep 10-filter (0.2-1.7 μm) HST imaging over one-third of the GOODS-South field. We find that the star formation episodes that built our SGs likely peaked in the redshift range 2 <z <5 (with a median of z ~ 3) and have decay time-scales shorter than ~1.5Gyr. Starburst time-scales and ages show no trend with stellar mass in the range 10 <M <10 M. However, the time-scales show increased scatter towards lower values ( 10M, and an age trend becomes evident in this mass regime: SGs with M > 10M are ~2 Gyr older than their counterparts with M <10M. Nevertheless, a smooth downsizing trend with galaxy mass is not observed, and the large scatter in starburst ages indicates that SGs are not a particularly coeval population. Around half of the blue SGs appear not to drive their star formation via major mergers, and those that have experienced a recent major merger show only modest enhancements (~40 per cent) in their specific star formation rates. Our empirical study indicates that processes other than major mergers (e.g. violent disc instability driven by cold streams and/or minor mergers) likely play a dominant role in building SGs, and creating a significant fraction of the old stellar populations that dominate today's Universe.en
dc.format.extent10
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofMonthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
dc.titleNewborn spheroids at high redshift : When and how did the dominant, old stars in today's massive galaxies form?en
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics
dc.contributor.institutionScience & Technology Research Institute
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Astrophysics Research
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1093/mnras/sts031
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


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