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dc.contributor.authorWatson, Anna
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-02T15:15:02Z
dc.date.available2013-09-02T15:15:02Z
dc.date.issued2008-04-01
dc.identifier.citationWatson , A 2008 , ' Small business growth through franchising : A qualitative investigation ' , Journal of Marketing Channels , vol. 15 , no. 1 , pp. 3-21 . https://doi.org/10.1080/10466690802081350
dc.identifier.issn1046-669X
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 1745777
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 116b4ecc-ab2e-4cf8-a9bf-683dc4d0cad2
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 67650087888
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/11486
dc.description.abstractAlthough franchising has long been recognised as an attractive means of growing a business, the impact of franchising for small businesses is an area that is relatively less researched and understood. Whilst resource scarcity and agency theory suggest many potential benefits to franchised firms, small businesses wishing to franchise are likely to encounter a number of challenges in translating their business concept into a successful franchise operation. This paper seeks to provide an insight into the challenges franchised firms are likely to face and considers the implications of franchising for small businesses' growth. Given the relative paucity of research in the area, this study has utilised a case study approach in order to provide a rich description and insight into the experiences of six businesses which have tried to expand using franchising, three of which have successfully grown, and three of which have subsequently withdrawn from franchising. It appeared that many of the failed companies were not prepared for the differing nature of the franchisor-franchisee relationship. In addition, the findings suggest that for businesses to franchise successfully, recruitment of suitable franchisees is vital. However, in the early days of system development the ability to recruit may be impeded by the system's lack of perceived legitimacy. This is likely to be exacerbated in periods of relative economic prosperity, when all franchise systems appear to find it more difficult to recruit. The results highlight the need for future research to explore further some of the key issues raised.en
dc.format.extent19
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Marketing Channels
dc.subjectFranchising
dc.subjectSmall business growth
dc.titleSmall business growth through franchising : A qualitative investigationen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Marketing and Enterprise
dc.contributor.institutionSocial Sciences, Arts & Humanities Research Institute
dc.contributor.institutionHertfordshire Business School
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Research on Management, Economy and Society
dc.contributor.institutionMarketing Insight Research Unit
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=67650087888&partnerID=8YFLogxK
dc.relation.schoolHertfordshire Business School
dcterms.dateAccepted2008-04-01
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1080/10466690802081350
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


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