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dc.contributor.authorEvans, Jennifer
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-03T10:15:16Z
dc.date.available2013-10-03T10:15:16Z
dc.date.issued2012-02
dc.identifier.citationEvans , J 2012 , ' 'Gentle Purges corrected with hot Spices, whether they work or not, do vehemently provoke Venery' : Menstrual Provocation and Procreation in Early Modern England ' , Social History of Medicine , vol. 25 , no. 1 , pp. 2-19 . https://doi.org/10.1093/shm/hkr021
dc.identifier.issn0951-631X
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 2290325
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: f5a4e86a-3187-4a81-b0e7-2ab97e902254
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84857338857
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/11721
dc.description.abstractThroughout the early modern period, medical writers described a plethora of remedies designed to provoke menstruation. This article will address the close relationship these substances had with provokers of lust. Historians have often viewed emmenagogues as covert expressions of abortive drugs. While they acknowledge that some women utilised these treatments for their intended purpose, to restore a regular menstrual cycle, they have more frequently asserted that they were more likely to be employed to remove an unwanted pregnancy. This article asserts that this understanding is in need of reappraisal and argues that these substances can be viewed as a key component of early modern fertility and sexual health care. This article demonstrates that provokers of venery and emmenagogues shared similar humoral virtues and that many compound remedies designed to restore purgation contained potent aphrodisiacs. By promoting a healthy menstrual cycle these substances ensured that the female reproductive system was fecund.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofSocial History of Medicine
dc.rightsOpen
dc.title'Gentle Purges corrected with hot Spices, whether they work or not, do vehemently provoke Venery' : Menstrual Provocation and Procreation in Early Modern Englanden
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Humanities
dc.contributor.institutionSocial Sciences, Arts & Humanities Research Institute
dc.contributor.institutionHistory
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Humanities
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Accepted Version
dcterms.dateAccepted2012-02
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1093/shm/hkr021
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeOpen


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