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dc.contributor.authorJefferies, Kiri
dc.contributor.authorLaws, K.R.
dc.contributor.authorFineberg, Naomi
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-25T06:36:38Z
dc.date.available2013-10-25T06:36:38Z
dc.date.issued2012-07
dc.identifier.citationJefferies , K , Laws , K R & Fineberg , N 2012 , ' Superior face recognition in Body Dysmorphic Disorder ' , Journal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders , vol. 1 , no. 3 , pp. 175-179 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jocrd.2012.03.002
dc.identifier.issn2211-3649
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 1963949
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: a6062451-9e3f-4f6c-9aee-b3014c500fdf
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000317145200005
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84865154590
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/11841
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Individuals with Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) may have a propensity for viewing faces differently from healthy controls. In an attempt to explore these processing changes in more detail, we investigate face processing in BDD using two facial recognition tasks; one testing the recognition of facial characteristics, the other testing the recognition of facial expressions of emotion. Method: Participants with BDD (n=12) and healthy controls (n=16) were tested for inverted face recognition using the Famous Faces Task (FFT) and the Facial Expression of Emotions Stimulus and Test emotion recognition task (FEEST). The groups were matched for age, IQ and education. Results: Participants with BDD showed a significant ability to correctly recognise inverted famous faces compared to well-matched controls. In contrast, participants with BDD showed a specific deficit in recognising fearful facial emotions. BDD participants excel over controls at performing the FFT. Conclusions: These findings may represent a cognitive marker for BOO. The specific deficit within the BDD group for recognising fearful expressions may be another feature of the disorder and may implicate abnormal processing of negatively valenced emotional material. The specificity of these findings for BOO merit further investigation using other clinical groups and a larger sample size. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en
dc.format.extent5
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders
dc.subjectINFORMATION
dc.subjectDEFICITS
dc.subjectAnxiety
dc.subjectNEURONAL RESPONSES
dc.subjectDEPRESSION
dc.subjectOBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDER
dc.subjectCITALOPRAM
dc.subjectBody Dysmorphic Disorder
dc.subjectANGRY FACES
dc.subjectANXIETY
dc.subjectSYMPTOMS
dc.subjectObsessive compulsive disorder
dc.subjectFace
dc.subjectWILLIAMS-SYNDROME
dc.titleSuperior face recognition in Body Dysmorphic Disorderen
dc.contributor.institutionHealth & Human Sciences Research Institute
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology
dc.contributor.institutionPsychology
dc.contributor.institutionCognitive Neuropsychology
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Health Services and Clinical Research
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology and Sports Sciences
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.jocrd.2012.03.002
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


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