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dc.contributor.authorPage, Hector J. I.
dc.contributor.authorWalters, Daniel M.
dc.contributor.authorKnight, Rebecca
dc.contributor.authorPiette, Caitlin E.
dc.contributor.authorJeffery, Kathryn J.
dc.contributor.authorStringer, Simon M.
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-07T14:59:06Z
dc.date.available2014-01-07T14:59:06Z
dc.date.issued2014-02-05
dc.identifier.citationPage , H J I , Walters , D M , Knight , R , Piette , C E , Jeffery , K J & Stringer , S M 2014 , ' A theoretical account of cue averaging in the rodent head direction system ' , Philosophical Transactions B: Biological Sciences , vol. 369 , no. 1635 , 20130283 . https://doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2013.0283
dc.identifier.issn0962-8436
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 2663166
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: a3d27041-1f0a-4183-ae68-0156bae7c18f
dc.identifier.otherPubMed: 24366143
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84890957610
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-9400-9377/work/35672768
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/12468
dc.descriptionCopyright 2013 The Authors. Published by the Royal Society under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/, which permits unrestricted use, provided the original author and source are credited
dc.description.abstractHead direction (HD) cell responses are thought to be derived from a combination of internal (or idiothetic) and external (or allothetic) sources of information. Recent work from the Jeffery laboratory shows that the relative influence of visual versus vestibular inputs upon the HD cell response depends on the disparity between these sources. In this paper, we present simulation results from a model designed to explain these observations. The model accurately replicates the Knight et al. data. We suggest that cue conflict resolution is critically dependent on plastic remapping of visual information onto the HD cell layer. This remap results in a shift in preferred directions of a subset of HD cells, which is then inherited by the rest of the cells during path integration. Thus, we demonstrate how, over a period of several minutes, a visual landmark may gain cue control. Furthermore, simulation results show that weaker visual landmarks fail to gain cue control as readily. We therefore suggest a second longer term plasticity in visual projections onto HD cell areas, through which landmarks with an inconsistent relationship to idiothetic information are made less salient, significantly hindering their ability to gain cue control. Our results provide a mechanism for reliability-weighted cue averaging that may pertain to other neural systems in addition to the HD system.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofPhilosophical Transactions B: Biological Sciences
dc.rightsOpen
dc.titleA theoretical account of cue averaging in the rodent head direction systemen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology
dc.contributor.institutionPsychology
dc.contributor.institutionCognitive Neuropsychology
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionHealth & Human Sciences Research Institute
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Published version
dcterms.dateAccepted2014-02-05
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2013.0283
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeOpen


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