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dc.contributor.authorDollimore, Denise E.
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-30T15:01:30Z
dc.date.available2014-06-30T15:01:30Z
dc.date.issued2014-06
dc.identifier.citationDollimore , D E 2014 , ' Untangling the Conceptual Isssues Raised in Reydon and Scholz’s Critique of Organizational Ecology and Darwinian Populations ' , Philosophy of the Social Sciences , vol. 44 , no. 3 , pp. 282-315 . https://doi.org/10.1177/0048393113481066
dc.identifier.issn0048-3931
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 857472
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: e81945f3-edcd-4109-9dba-1ca3f1865a37
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84899971724
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/13867
dc.description.abstractReydon and Scholz raise doubts about the Darwinian status of organizational ecology by arguing that Darwinian principles are not applicable to organizational populations. Although their critique of organizational ecology’s typological essentialism is correct, they go on to reject the Darwinian status of organizational populations. This paper claims that the distinction between replicators and interactors, raised in modern philosophy of biology but not discussed by Reydon and Scholz, points the way forward for organizational ecologists. It is possible to conceptualise evolving Darwinian populations providing the inheritance mechanism is appropriately specified. By this approach, adaptation and selection are no longer dichotomised, and the evolutionary significance of knowledge transmission is highlighteden
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofPhilosophy of the Social Sciences
dc.subjectOrganizational ecology
dc.subjectDarwinian populations
dc.subjectreplicator interactor distinction
dc.subjectadaptation
dc.subjectselection
dc.subjectinheritance
dc.subjectSocial Sciences(all)
dc.titleUntangling the Conceptual Isssues Raised in Reydon and Scholz’s Critique of Organizational Ecology and Darwinian Populationsen
dc.contributor.institutionGroup for Research in Organisational Evolution
dc.contributor.institutionHertfordshire Business School
dc.contributor.institutionSocial Sciences, Arts & Humanities Research Institute
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Research on Management, Economy and Society
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Management, Leadership and Organisation
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1177/0048393113481066
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


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