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dc.contributor.authorMorein-Zamir, Sharon
dc.contributor.authorPapmeyer, Martina
dc.contributor.authorDurieux, Alice
dc.contributor.authorFineberg, Naomi A.
dc.contributor.authorSahakian, Barbara J.
dc.contributor.authorRobbins, Trevor W.
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-06T11:59:32Z
dc.date.available2014-11-06T11:59:32Z
dc.date.issued2013-11-08
dc.identifier.citationMorein-Zamir , S , Papmeyer , M , Durieux , A , Fineberg , N A , Sahakian , B J & Robbins , T W 2013 , ' Investigation of attentional bias in obsessive compulsive disorder with and without depression in visual search ' , PLoS ONE , vol. 8 , no. 11 , e80118 . https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0080118
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 7723619
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: ea325301-f5c6-4e2a-9d5e-be62e94d0019
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84892536727
dc.identifier.otherPubMed: 24260343
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/14698
dc.descriptionCopyright: © 2013 Morein-Zamir et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited
dc.description.abstractWhether Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is associated with an increased attentional bias to emotive stimuli remains controversial. Additionally, it is unclear whether comorbid depression modulates abnormal emotional processing in OCD. This study examined attentional bias to OC-relevant scenes using a visual search task. Controls, non-depressed and depressed OCD patients searched for their personally selected positive images amongst their negative distractors, and vice versa. Whilst the OCD groups were slower than healthy individuals in rating the images, there were no group differences in the magnitude of negative bias to concern-related scenes. A second experiment employing a common set of images replicated the results on an additional sample of OCD patients. Although there was a larger bias to negative OC-related images without pre-exposure overall, no group differences in attentional bias were observed. However, OCD patients subsequently rated the images more slowly and more negatively, again suggesting post-attentional processing abnormalities. The results argue against a robust attentional bias in OCD patients, regardless of their depression status and speak to generalized difficulties disengaging from negative valence stimuli. Rather, post-attentional processing abnormalities may account for differences in emotional processing in OCD.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS ONE
dc.rightsOpen
dc.subjectAgricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
dc.subjectBiochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
dc.subjectMedicine(all)
dc.titleInvestigation of attentional bias in obsessive compulsive disorder with and without depression in visual searchen
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Health Services and Clinical Research
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology and Sports Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Published version
dcterms.dateAccepted2013-11-08
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0080118
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeOpen


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