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dc.contributor.authorHodgson, G.M.
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-17T15:29:27Z
dc.date.available2014-11-17T15:29:27Z
dc.date.issued2014-12-31
dc.identifier.citationHodgson , G M 2014 , ' On fuzzy frontiers and fragmented foundations : some reflections on the original and new institutional economics ' , Journal of Institutional Economics , vol. 10 , no. Special issue 4 , pp. 591-611 . https://doi.org/10.1017/S1744137414000307
dc.identifier.issn1744-1374
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 7612827
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 8724598d-969c-4d10-8d44-fc3670b69275
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84910137602
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/14771
dc.descriptionThis article has been published in a revised form in Journal of Institutional Economics, doi: https://doi.org/10.1017/S1744137414000307 This version is free to view and download for private research and study only. Not for re-distribution, re-sale or use in derivative works. © 2014 Millennium Economics Ltd, published by Cambridge University Press.
dc.description.abstractThese reflections are prompted by the papers by Ménard (2014) and Ménard and Shirley (2014). Their essays centre on the path-breaking contributions to the 'new institutional economics' (NIE) by Ronald Coase, Douglass North and Oliver Williamson. In response, while recognising their substantial achievements, it is pointed out that these three thinkers had contrasting views on key points. Furthermore, Ménard's and Shirley's three 'golden triangle' NIE concepts - transaction costs, property rights and contracts - are themselves disputed. Once all this is acknowledged, differences of view appear within the NIE, raising interesting questions concerning its identity and boundaries, including its differences with the original institutionalism. There are sizeable overlaps between the two traditions. It is argued here that the NIE can learn from the original institutionalism, particularly when elaborating more dynamic analyses, and developing more nuanced, psychologically-grounded and empirically viable theories of human motivation.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Institutional Economics
dc.rightsOpen
dc.subjectEconomics, Econometrics and Finance(all)
dc.titleOn fuzzy frontiers and fragmented foundations : some reflections on the original and new institutional economicsen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Accounting, Finance and Economics
dc.contributor.institutionSocial Sciences, Arts & Humanities Research Institute
dc.contributor.institutionHertfordshire Business School
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Research on Management, Economy and Society
dc.contributor.institutionGroup for Research in Organisational Evolution
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.relation.schoolHertfordshire Business School
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Accepted Version
dcterms.dateAccepted2014-12-31
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1017/S1744137414000307
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeOpen


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