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dc.contributor.authorDraper, Heather
dc.contributor.authorSorell, Tom
dc.contributor.authorBedaf, Sandra
dc.contributor.authorSyrdal, D.S.
dc.contributor.authorGutierrez-Ruiz, Carolina
dc.contributor.authorDuclos, Alexandre
dc.contributor.authorAmirabdollahian, Farshid
dc.contributor.editorBeetz, Michael
dc.contributor.editorJohnston, Benjamin
dc.contributor.editorWilliams, Mary-Anne
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-05T14:17:35Z
dc.date.available2015-01-05T14:17:35Z
dc.date.issued2014-09
dc.identifier.citationDraper , H , Sorell , T , Bedaf , S , Syrdal , D S , Gutierrez-Ruiz , C , Duclos , A & Amirabdollahian , F 2014 , Ethical dimensions of human-robot interactions in the care of older people : Insights from 21 focus groups convened in the UK, France and the Netherlands . in M Beetz , B Johnston & M-A Williams (eds) , Social Robotics . Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) , vol. 8755 , Springer-Verlag, (Berlin-Heidelberg) , pp. 135-145 , 6th International Conference on Social Robotics, ICSR 2014 , Sydney , United Kingdom , 27/10/14 .
dc.identifier.citationconference
dc.identifier.isbn9783319119724
dc.identifier.issn0302-9743
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 7921955
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: f47d3414-9db6-4353-a556-293c1e1e8efe
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84910002472
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/15054
dc.description.abstractWe briefly report the method and four findings of a large-scale qualitative study of potential users’ views on the ethical values that should govern the design and programming of social robots for older people. 21 focus groups were convened in the UK, France and the Netherlands. We present and briefly discuss our data on: 1) the contrasting attitudes of older people and formal and informal carers about how well technology might be received by older users; 2) views about healthcare professionals, informal and formal carers having access to private information about householders that has been collected by the robot; 3) the belief that robots could not, as well as should not, replace human contact because persuasion is regarded a uniquely human skill; and 4) differing perceptions of the role of the robot and how this was used to justify ethical opinions on robot behavior.en
dc.format.extent11
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSpringer-Verlag, (Berlin-Heidelberg)
dc.relation.ispartofSocial Robotics
dc.relation.ispartofseriesLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
dc.subjectAssistive technology
dc.subjectAutonomy
dc.subjectCare-robots
dc.subjectElderly people
dc.subjectEthics
dc.subjectOlder people
dc.subjectPaternalism
dc.subjectPrivacy
dc.subjectQualitative data
dc.subjectSocial robots
dc.subjectUser engagement
dc.subjectUser views
dc.subjectComputer Science(all)
dc.subjectTheoretical Computer Science
dc.titleEthical dimensions of human-robot interactions in the care of older people : Insights from 21 focus groups convened in the UK, France and the Netherlandsen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Computer Science
dc.contributor.institutionScience & Technology Research Institute
dc.contributor.institutionAdaptive Systems
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Computer Science and Informatics Research
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Computer Science
dcterms.dateAccepted2014-09
rioxxterms.typeOther
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


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