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dc.contributor.authorHolderness, G.
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-24T15:04:13Z
dc.date.available2015-04-24T15:04:13Z
dc.date.issued2014-12-01
dc.identifier.citationHolderness , G 2014 , ' Review Article: Shakespeare and Perception ' , Critical Survey , vol. 26 , no. 3 , pp. 92-108 . https://doi.org/10.3167/cs.2014.260311
dc.identifier.issn0011-1570
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 8240609
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 106ecc2b-fd89-4520-baa6-1ccd0b07169c
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/15831
dc.description.abstractThis article reads some familiar speeches from key Shakespeare plays in the light of modern theories of perception, asking the Shakespeare texts for advice on such matters as “inattentional blindness,” “the distribution of the sensible,” visual perception and imagination, the “extended mind,” and “embodied cognition”. Holderness triangulates Shakespeare’s dramatic poetry with contemporary psychological and philosophical theories, and early modern works of philosophy and medicine, and asks whether these convergences are endorsements of Shakespeare’s universal wisdom, or genuinely new ways of seeing Shakespeare and the world.en
dc.format.extent17
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofCritical Survey
dc.titleReview Article: Shakespeare and Perceptionen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Humanities
dc.contributor.institutionSocial Sciences, Arts & Humanities Research Institute
dc.contributor.institutionEnglish Literature and Creative Writing
dc.contributor.institutionEnglish Literature
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.3167/cs.2014.260311
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


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