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dc.contributor.authorŚlusarczyk, Elzbieta
dc.contributor.authorNiedzwienska, Agnieszka
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-28T09:04:03Z
dc.date.available2015-04-28T09:04:03Z
dc.date.issued2013-07-01
dc.identifier.citationŚlusarczyk , E & Niedzwienska , A 2013 , ' A naturalistic study of prospective memory in preschoolers : The role of task interruption and motivation ' , Cognitive Development , vol. 28 , no. 3 , pp. 179-192 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2012.10.004
dc.identifier.issn0885-2014
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 7650671
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 94ac6e9d-73c9-4dfe-87e3-3eac75ac8855
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84882743144
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/15860
dc.description.abstractWe conducted two naturalistic experiments to investigate preschoolers' development of event-based prospective memory (PM) and to examine the effects of motivation and interruption of an ongoing task. Children aged 2-6 years were asked to perform familiar PM tasks while engaged in their habitual kindergarten play. PM performance improved systematically across the preschool years. The type of PM response (motor or verbal) did not affect performance. High motivation was necessary for 2-year-olds to perform well, and it remained an important factor that increased performance across the entire preschool age range. The need to interrupt an ongoing activity decreased performance in 3-, 4-, and 5-year-olds, but not in children aged 2 or 6 years. The pattern of results is consistent with explanations for interruption effects that highlight the role of inhibitory control.en
dc.format.extent14
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofCognitive Development
dc.subjectInhibitory control
dc.subjectMemory development
dc.subjectMotivation
dc.subjectPreschoolers
dc.subjectProspective memory
dc.subjectTask interruption
dc.subjectDevelopmental and Educational Psychology
dc.subjectExperimental and Cognitive Psychology
dc.titleA naturalistic study of prospective memory in preschoolers : The role of task interruption and motivationen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionHealth & Human Sciences Research Institute
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dcterms.dateAccepted2013-07-01
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2012.10.004
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


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