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dc.contributor.authorCurrie, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorBogaard, Amy
dc.contributor.authorCesaretti, Rudolf
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, Neil R.
dc.contributor.authorFrancois, Pieter
dc.contributor.authorHolden, Philip
dc.contributor.authorHoyer, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorKorotayev, Andrey
dc.contributor.authorManning, Joseph
dc.contributor.authorMoreno Garcia, Juan Carlos
dc.contributor.authorOyebamiji, Oluwole K.
dc.contributor.authorPetrie, Cameron
dc.contributor.authorTurchin, Peter
dc.contributor.authorWhitehouse, Harvey
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Alice
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-06T13:21:05Z
dc.date.available2015-07-06T13:21:05Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationCurrie , T , Bogaard , A , Cesaretti , R , Edwards , N R , Francois , P , Holden , P , Hoyer , D , Korotayev , A , Manning , J , Moreno Garcia , J C , Oyebamiji , O K , Petrie , C , Turchin , P , Whitehouse , H & Williams , A 2015 , ' Agricultural productivity in past societies : Toward an empirically informed model for testing cultural evolutionary hypotheses ' , Cliodynamics: The Journal of Quantitative History and Cultural Evolution , vol. 6 , no. 1 , pp. 24-56 .
dc.identifier.issn2373-7530
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 8704875
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 9ba47110-fe9d-4c35-a751-17fcad4ffe3d
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84962440981
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/16140
dc.description.abstractAgricultural productivity, and its variation in space and time, plays a fundamental role in many theories of human social evolution. However, we often lack systematic information about the productivity of past agricultural systems on a large enough scale in order to be able to test these theories properly. The effect of climate on crop yields has received a great deal of attention resulting in a range of empirical and process-based models, yet the focus has primarily been on current or future conditions. In this paper, we argue for a “bottom-up” approach that estimates productivity, or potential productivity based on information about the agricultural practices and technologies used in past societies. Of key theoretical interest is using this information to estimate the carrying capacity of a given region, independently of estimates of population size. We outline how explicit crop yield models can be combined with high quality historical and archaeological information about past societies, in order to infer the temporal and geographic patterns of change in agricultural productivity and potential. We discuss the kinds of information we need to collect about agricultural techniques and practices in the past, and introduce a new databank initiative we have developed for collating the best available historical and archaeological evidence. A key benefit of our approach lies in making explicit the steps in the process of estimating past productivities and carrying capacities, and in being able to assess the effects of different modelling assumptions. This is undoubtedly an ambitious task, yet promises to provide important insights into fundamental aspects of past societies, and will enable us to test more rigorously key hypotheses about human socio-cultural evolution.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofCliodynamics: The Journal of Quantitative History and Cultural Evolution
dc.rights/dk/atira/pure/core/openaccesspermission/open
dc.titleAgricultural productivity in past societies : Toward an empirically informed model for testing cultural evolutionary hypothesesen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Humanities
dc.contributor.institutionSocial Sciences, Arts & Humanities Research Institute
dc.contributor.institutionHistory
dc.contributor.institutionDigital History Research Centre
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.identifier.urlhttps://escholarship.org/uc/item/4h29270b#page-1
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Humanities
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Published version
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeopenAccess


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