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dc.contributor.authorForster, Hannah
dc.contributor.authorFallaize, Rosalind
dc.contributor.authorGallagher, Caroline
dc.contributor.authorO'Donovan, Clare B.
dc.contributor.authorWoolhead, Clara
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, Marianne C.
dc.contributor.authorMacready, Anna L.
dc.contributor.authorLovegrove, Julie A.
dc.contributor.authorMathers, John C.
dc.contributor.authorGibney, Michael J.
dc.contributor.authorBrennan, Lorraine
dc.contributor.authorGibney, Eileen R.
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-14T08:36:21Z
dc.date.available2015-07-14T08:36:21Z
dc.date.issued2014-06-09
dc.identifier.citationForster , H , Fallaize , R , Gallagher , C , O'Donovan , C B , Woolhead , C , Walsh , M C , Macready , A L , Lovegrove , J A , Mathers , J C , Gibney , M J , Brennan , L & Gibney , E R 2014 , ' Online dietary intake estimation : The food4me food frequency questionnaire ' , Journal of Medical Internet Research , vol. 16 , no. 6 , e150 . https://doi.org/10.2196/jmir.3105
dc.identifier.issn1439-4456
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 8665198
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 6378214c-49bb-41f0-8e12-a24ae3efd793
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84906222951
dc.identifier.otherPubMed: 24911957
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/16154
dc.descriptionCopyright ©Hannah Forster, Rosalind Fallaize, Caroline Gallagher, Clare B O’Donovan, Clara Woolhead, Marianne C Walsh, Anna L Macready, Julie A Lovegrove, John C Mathers, Michael J Gibney, Lorraine Brennan, Eileen R Gibney. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 09.06.2014. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work, first published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, is properly cited. The complete bibliographic information, a link to the original publication on http://www.jmir.org/, as well as this copyright and license information must be included.
dc.description.abstractDietary assessment methods are important tools for nutrition research. Online dietary assessment tools have the potential to become invaluable methods of assessing dietary intake because, compared with traditional methods, they have many advantages including the automatic storage of input data and the immediate generation of nutritional outputs. Objective: The aim of this study was to develop an online food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) for dietary data collection in the Food4Me study and to compare this with the validated European Prospective Investigation of Cancer (EPIC) Norfolk printed FFQ. Methods: The Food4Me FFQ used in this analysis was developed to consist of 157 food items. Standardized color photographs were incorporated in the development of the Food4Me FFQ to facilitate accurate quantification of the portion size of each food item. Participants were recruited in two centers (Dublin, Ireland and Reading, United Kingdom) and each received the online Food4Me FFQ and the printed EPIC-Norfolk FFQ in random order. Participants completed the Food4Me FFQ online and, for most food items, participants were requested to choose their usual serving size among seven possibilities from a range of portion size pictures. The level of agreement between the two methods was evaluated for both nutrient and food group intakes using the Bland and Altman method and classification into quartiles of daily intake. Correlations were calculated for nutrient and food group intakes. Results: A total of 113 participants were recruited with a mean age of 30 (SD 10) years (40.7% male, 46/113; 59.3%, 67/113 female). Cross-classification into exact plus adjacent quartiles ranged from 77% to 97% at the nutrient level and 77% to 99% at the food group level. Agreement at the nutrient level was highest for alcohol (97%) and lowest for percent energy from polyunsaturated fatty acids (77%). Crude unadjusted correlations for nutrients ranged between .43 and .86. Agreement at the food group level was highest for other fruits (eg, apples, pears, oranges) and lowest for cakes, pastries, and buns. For food groups, correlations ranged between .41 and .90. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that the online Food4Me FFQ has good agreement with the validated printed EPIC-Norfolk FFQ for assessing both nutrient and food group intakes, rendering it a useful tool for ranking individuals based on nutrient and food group intakes.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Medical Internet Research
dc.rightsOpen
dc.subjectDietary assessment
dc.subjectFood frequency questionnaire
dc.subjectFood4Me
dc.subjectOnline dietary assessment tool
dc.subjectWeb-based
dc.subjectHealth Informatics
dc.subjectMedicine(all)
dc.titleOnline dietary intake estimation : The food4me food frequency questionnaireen
dc.contributor.institutionWeight and Obesity Research Group
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Human and Environmental Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionHealth & Human Sciences Research Institute
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Published version
dcterms.dateAccepted2014-06-09
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.2196/jmir.3105
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeOpen


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