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dc.contributor.authorBottoms, Lindsay
dc.contributor.authorGreenhalgh, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorGregory, Kim
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-12T19:02:10Z
dc.date.available2015-08-12T19:02:10Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationBottoms , L , Greenhalgh , A & Gregory , K 2013 , ' The effect of caffeine ingestion on skill maintenance and fatigue in epee fencers ' , Journal of Sports Sciences , vol. 31 , no. 10 , pp. 1091-99 . https://doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2013.764466
dc.identifier.issn0264-0414
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 8756362
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 376eba44-8146-41de-af44-930d624f68cf
dc.identifier.otherPubMed: 23383959
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84877827851
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/16211
dc.description.abstractThe ergogenic effect of caffeine on sports performance focuses predominantly on endurance sports (Doherty & Smith, 2004 ) with little research on intermittent high intensity sports. This study aimed to explore the effect of caffeine ingestion on skill maintenance following fencing simulated exercise. Eleven competitive fencers participated (four female; seven male; age 33 ± 6.5 years). Following a maximal test to exhaustion, fencers completed two trials assessing accuracy and reaction times (Stroop test) before and after a fatiguing protocol designed to simulate the demands of a fencing competition. Skill testing involved 30 lunges to hit a target. 500 ml placebo or 3 mg · kg(-1) caffeine supplemented drink was administered after the initial reaction and skill tests in a single-blind crossover design. The fatiguing protocol involved simulating six fights with 6-minute rests between each. Fencers rated their perceived exertion (arm, legs, overall) using the Borg scale. There was no overall effect of caffeine on total skill score (P = 0.40), however there was a tendency for fewer misses with caffeine (P = 0.10). Caffeine had no effect on the Stroop Test. Caffeine produced significantly lower perceived fatigue for overall (P < 0.01). These results provide some support for caffeine producing maintenance of skill and reducing perceived fatigue during fencing.en
dc.format.extent9
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Sports Sciences
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectArm
dc.subjectAthletic Performance
dc.subjectCaffeine
dc.subjectCentral Nervous System Stimulants
dc.subjectCross-Over Studies
dc.subjectDietary Supplements
dc.subjectExercise
dc.subjectFatigue
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectLeg
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMotor Skills
dc.subjectPerception
dc.subjectPhysical Endurance
dc.subjectPhysical Exertion
dc.subjectReaction Time
dc.subjectRest
dc.subjectSingle-Blind Method
dc.subjectSports
dc.titleThe effect of caffeine ingestion on skill maintenance and fatigue in epee fencersen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionHealth & Human Sciences Research Institute
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Human and Environmental Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionPsychology of Movement
dc.contributor.institutionSport, Health and Exercise
dc.contributor.institutionFunctional Therapy and Biomechanics
dc.contributor.institutionAdaptive Physiology and Functional Nutrition
dc.contributor.institutionHealth and Wellbeing
dc.contributor.institutionWeight and Obesity Research Group
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dcterms.dateAccepted2013
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2013.764466
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


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