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dc.contributor.authorTun, Jimmy Kyaw
dc.contributor.authorAlinier, Guillaume
dc.contributor.authorTang, Jessica
dc.contributor.authorKneebone, Roger L.
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-08T08:02:04Z
dc.date.available2015-10-08T08:02:04Z
dc.date.issued2015-04-22
dc.identifier.citationTun , J K , Alinier , G , Tang , J & Kneebone , R L 2015 , ' Redefining Simulation Fidelity for Healthcare Education ' , Simulation and Gaming , vol. 46 , no. 2 , pp. 159-174 . https://doi.org/10.1177/1046878115576103
dc.identifier.issn1046-8781
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 9260629
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: f7afb756-c364-4c7d-98e7-2013e2619956
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84941921307
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/16502
dc.description.abstractBackground. Fidelity - an intrinsic property of simulation is crucial to simulation design and to educational effectiveness. Yet the term fidelity is inconsistently used, which makes it difficult to draw inferences from current literature and translate research into practice. Aim. In this article, we attempt to bring some clarity to the term simulation fidelity in healthcare education. Method. We are opposed to the notion that high-fidelity simulation requires complete and faithful replication of reality, and instead argue for an accurate representation of real-world cues and stimuli. We address a number of issues surrounding the term fidelity and how it is currently used in the literature. Result. In recognising the limitations of current methods of describing fidelity in the literature, we propose an alternative 3-dimensional framework for fidelity along the axes of the patient, clinical scenario, and healthcare facilities as a means for more precise and practical positioning of current healthcare simulation activities. Conclusion. All aspects of fidelity significantly hinge on the learners’ perceived realism of the context of the learning episode as opposed to any one particular element such as the technology used.en
dc.format.extent16
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofSimulation and Gaming
dc.rightsOpen
dc.subjectclinical facilities
dc.subjectclinical scenario
dc.subjectcues
dc.subjectdeception
dc.subjecteducational effectiveness
dc.subjectenvironment
dc.subjectfidelity
dc.subjectframework
dc.subjecthealthcare
dc.subjecthealthcare simulation
dc.subjectlearner perception
dc.subjectlearning experience
dc.subjectpatient
dc.subjectrealism
dc.subjectrepresentation
dc.subjectscenario design
dc.subjectsimulation design
dc.subjectsimulation-based training
dc.subjectComputer Science Applications
dc.subjectBusiness, Management and Accounting (miscellaneous)
dc.titleRedefining Simulation Fidelity for Healthcare Educationen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Allied Health Professions and Midwifery
dc.contributor.institutionHealth & Human Sciences Research Institute
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Health and Social Work
dc.contributor.institutionAllied Health Professions
dc.contributor.institutionParamedic Science
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Health and Social Work
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Accepted Version
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-04-22
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1177/1046878115576103
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeOpen


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