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dc.contributor.authorMahmuti, M.
dc.contributor.authorWest, Jon S.
dc.contributor.authorWatts, J.
dc.contributor.authorGladders, P.
dc.contributor.authorFitt, Bruce D.L.
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-03T10:37:30Z
dc.date.available2016-03-03T10:37:30Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.citationMahmuti , M , West , J S , Watts , J , Gladders , P & Fitt , B D L 2009 , ' Controlling crop disease contributes to both food security and climate change mitigation ' , International Journal of Agricultural Sustainability , vol. 7 , no. 3 , pp. 189-202 . https://doi.org/10.3763/ijas.2009.0476
dc.identifier.issn1473-5903
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 440379
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 3da259f7-2181-4a57-9adc-65e9180e2e6e
dc.identifier.otherWOS: 000271433500005
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 77949284768
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/16626
dc.descriptionOriginal article can be found at: http://www.tandfonline.com/ Copyright Taylor & Francis
dc.description.abstractGlobal food security is threatened by crop diseases that account for average yield losses of 16 per cent, with the greatest losses experienced by subsistence farmers in the developing world. Climate change is exacerbating the threats to food security in such areas, emphasizing the need to increase food production in northern European countries such as the UK. However, the crops must be grown in such a way as to minimize greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with their production. As an example, it is estimated that production of UK winter oilseed rape is associated with GHG of 3300 kg CO2 eq. ha(-1) of crop and 834 kg CO2 eq. t(-1) of seed yield, with 79 per cent of the GHG associated with the use of nitrogen fertilizer. Furthermore, it is estimated that control of diseases by use of fungicides in this UK oilseed rape is associated with a decrease in GHG of 100 kg CO2 eq. t(-1) of seed. Winter oilseed rape cultivar disease resistance is associated with a decrease in GHG of 56 kg CO2 eq. t(-1), although this figure is an underestimate. These results demonstrate how disease control in arable crops can make a contribution to both climate change mitigation and sustainable arable crop production to ensure global food security.en
dc.format.extent14
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Agricultural Sustainability
dc.subjectadaptation to climate change
dc.subjectdisease resistance
dc.subjectfood security
dc.subjectfungicides
dc.subjectgreenhouse gas emissions
dc.subjectoilseed rape
dc.titleControlling crop disease contributes to both food security and climate change mitigationen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Human and Environmental Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionHealth & Human Sciences Research Institute
dc.contributor.institutionGeography, Environment and Agriculture
dc.contributor.institutionCrop and Environmental Protection
dc.contributor.institutionAgriculture, Veterinary and Food Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionWeight and Obesity Research Group
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.3763/ijas.2009.0476
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


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