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dc.contributor.authorVoon, V.
dc.contributor.authorDerbyshire, K.
dc.contributor.authorRück, C.
dc.contributor.authorIrvine, M. A.
dc.contributor.authorWorbe, Y.
dc.contributor.authorEnander, J.
dc.contributor.authorSchreiber, L. R. N.
dc.contributor.authorGillan, C.
dc.contributor.authorFineberg, N. A.
dc.contributor.authorSahakian, B. J.
dc.contributor.authorRobbins, T. W.
dc.contributor.authorHarrison, N. A.
dc.contributor.authorWood, J.
dc.contributor.authorDaw, N. D.
dc.contributor.authorDayan, P.
dc.contributor.authorGrant, J. E.
dc.contributor.authorBullmore, E.T.
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-16T10:14:28Z
dc.date.available2016-03-16T10:14:28Z
dc.date.issued2015-03-12
dc.identifier.citationVoon , V , Derbyshire , K , Rück , C , Irvine , M A , Worbe , Y , Enander , J , Schreiber , L R N , Gillan , C , Fineberg , N A , Sahakian , B J , Robbins , T W , Harrison , N A , Wood , J , Daw , N D , Dayan , P , Grant , J E & Bullmore , E T 2015 , ' Disorders of compulsivity : A common bias towards learning habits ' , Molecular Psychiatry , vol. 20 , no. 3 , pp. 345-352 . https://doi.org/10.1038/mp.2014.44
dc.identifier.issn1359-4184
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 9694215
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 0fca0e47-6048-4f2e-a0f2-466853261f5c
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84924655858
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/16789
dc.descriptionThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
dc.description.abstractWhy do we repeat choices that we know are bad for us? Decision making is characterized by the parallel engagement of two distinct systems, goal-directed and habitual, thought to arise from two computational learning mechanisms, model-based and model-free. The habitual system is a candidate source of pathological fixedness. Using a decision task that measures the contribution to learning of either mechanism, we show a bias towards model-free (habit) acquisition in disorders involving both natural (binge eating) and artificial (methamphetamine) rewards, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. This favoring of model-free learning may underlie the repetitive behaviors that ultimately dominate in these disorders. Further, we show that the habit formation bias is associated with lower gray matter volumes in caudate and medial orbitofrontal cortex. Our findings suggest that the dysfunction in a common neurocomputational mechanism may underlie diverse disorders involving compulsion.en
dc.format.extent8
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofMolecular Psychiatry
dc.rightsOpen
dc.subjectMolecular Biology
dc.subjectPsychiatry and Mental health
dc.subjectCellular and Molecular Neuroscience
dc.titleDisorders of compulsivity : A common bias towards learning habitsen
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Health Services and Clinical Research
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology and Sports Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Published version
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-03-12
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1038/mp.2014.44
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeOpen


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