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dc.contributor.authorSmith, Julie
dc.contributor.authorAndersson , Gunilla
dc.contributor.authorGourlay, Robin
dc.contributor.authorKarner , Sandra
dc.contributor.authorEgberg Mikkelsen , Bent
dc.contributor.authorSonnino , Roberta
dc.contributor.authorBarling, David
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-30T14:12:05Z
dc.date.available2016-03-30T14:12:05Z
dc.date.issued2016-01-20
dc.identifier.citationSmith , J , Andersson , G , Gourlay , R , Karner , S , Egberg Mikkelsen , B , Sonnino , R & Barling , D 2016 , ' Balancing competing policy demands : the case of sustainable public sector food procurement ' , Journal of Cleaner Production , vol. 112 , no. 1 , pp. 249-256 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2015.07.065
dc.identifier.issn0959-6526
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 9312198
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: efc0357a-865c-4761-b32b-7676e7e2edcd
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84938152711
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/16857
dc.descriptionThis document is the Accepted Manuscript version of the following article: Julie Smith, Gumilla Andersson, Robin Gourlay, Sandra Karner, Bent Egberg Mikkelsen, Roberta Sonnino, and David Barling, ‘Balancing competing policy demands: the case of sustainable public sector food procurement’, Journal of Cleaner Production, Vol. 112 (Part 1): 249-256, January 2016, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2015.07.065. This manuscript version is made available under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ ), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, and is not altered, transformed, or built upon in any way.
dc.description.abstractA focus on market-based green growth strategies to pursue sustainability goals neglects the pursuit of understanding how human health is interwoven with the health of eco-systems to deliver sustainability goals. The article argues that clarifying the difference between green and sustainable public sector food procurement, with political continuity that supports and enables policymakers and practitioners to take an incremental approach to change, makes an important contribution to delivering more sustainable food systems and better public health nutrition. Five European case studies demonstrate the reality of devising and implementing innovative approaches to sustainable public sector food procurement and the effects of cultural and political framings. How legislation is enacted at the national level and interpreted at the local level is a key driver for sustainable procurement. Transition is dependent on political will and leadership and an infrastructure that can balance the economic, environmental and social drivers to effect change. The development of systems and indicators to measure change, reforms to EU directives on procurement, and the relationship between green growth strategies and sustainable diets are also discussed. The findings show the need to explore how consistent definitions for green public procurement and sustainable public procurement can be refined and standardized in order to support governments at all levels in reviewing and analysing their current food procurement strategies and practices to improve sustainabilityen
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Cleaner Production
dc.rightsEmbargoed
dc.subjectSustainable public procurement; green growth strategies; public health nutrition; sustainable diets; EU procurement regulation; urban and regional governments.
dc.titleBalancing competing policy demands : the case of sustainable public sector food procurementen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionHealth & Human Sciences Research Institute
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Human and Environmental Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biological and Environmental Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionGeography, Environment and Agriculture
dc.contributor.institutionWeight and Obesity Research Group
dc.contributor.institutionAgriculture, Food and Veterinary Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionFood Policy, Nutrition and Diet
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.date.embargoedUntil2016-07-18
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Accepted Version
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-01-20
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2015.07.065
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeEmbargoed


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