Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSchmuker, Michael
dc.contributor.authorBahr, Viktor
dc.contributor.authorHuerta, Ramón
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-16T18:15:10Z
dc.date.available2017-01-16T18:15:10Z
dc.date.issued2016-11-01
dc.identifier.citationSchmuker , M , Bahr , V & Huerta , R 2016 , ' Exploiting plume structure to decode gas source distance using metal-oxide gas sensors ' , Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical , vol. 235 , pp. 636-646 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.snb.2016.05.098
dc.identifier.issn0925-4005
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 10469804
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 77e6a797-bf39-4af3-8d4f-5b8138d98973
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84973530106
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/17523
dc.descriptionThis document is the Accepted Manuscript version of the following article: Michael Schmuker, Viktor Bahr, & Ramon Huerta, ‘Exploiting plume structure to decode gas source distance using metal-oxide gas sensors’, Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical, Vol. 235: 636-646, November 2016, doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.snb.2016.05.098. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/. Published by Elsevier.
dc.description.abstractEstimating the distance of a gas source is important in many applications of chemical sensing, like e.g. environmental monitoring, or chemically-guided robot navigation. If an estimation of the gas concentration at the source is available, source proximity can be estimated from the time-averaged gas concentration at the sensing site. However, in turbulent environments, where fast concentration fluctuations dominate, comparably long measurements are required to obtain a reliable estimate. A lesser known feature that can be exploited for distance estimation in a turbulent environment lies in the relationship between source proximity and the temporal variance of the local gas concentration - the farther the source, the more intermittent are gas encounters. However, exploiting this feature requires measurement of changes in gas concentration on a comparably fast time scale, that have up to now only been achieved using photo-ionisation detectors. Here, we demonstrate that by appropriate signal processing, off-the-shelf metal-oxide sensors are capable of extracting rapidly fluctuating features of gas plumes that strongly correlate with source distance. We show that with a straightforward analysis method it is possible to decode events of large, consistent changes in the measured signal, so-called 'bouts'. The frequency of these bouts predicts the distance of a gas source in wind-tunnel experiments with good accuracy. In addition, we found that the variance of bout counts indicates cross-wind offset to the centreline of the gas plume. Our results offer an alternative approach to estimating gas source proximity that is largely independent of gas concentration, using off-the-shelf metal-oxide sensors. The analysis method we employ demands very few computational resources and is suitable for low-power microcontrollers.en
dc.format.extent11
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofSensors and Actuators B: Chemical
dc.subjectGas plumes
dc.subjectMetal-oxide sensors
dc.subjectSignal processing
dc.subjectSource proximity estimation
dc.subjectTurbulence
dc.titleExploiting plume structure to decode gas source distance using metal-oxide gas sensorsen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Computer Science
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.date.embargoedUntil2017-05-19
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84973530106&partnerID=8YFLogxK
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.snb.2016.05.098
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record