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dc.contributor.authorLippitt, John
dc.contributor.editorRenz, Ursula
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-27T08:01:51Z
dc.date.available2017-04-27T08:01:51Z
dc.date.issued2017-01-05
dc.identifier.citationLippitt , J 2017 , Self-knowledge in Kierkegaard . in U Renz (ed.) , Self-Knowledge: A History . Oxford Philosophical Concepts , OUP , Oxford , pp. 205-222 . https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190226411.003.0014
dc.identifier.isbn9780190226428
dc.identifier.isbn9780190630553
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 8570881
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 6d3edc43-cf95-44b5-9348-d3eae4137719
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/18082
dc.descriptionThis document is a draft of a chapter that has been published by Oxford University Press in Ursula Renz, ed., Self-Knowledge: a history, (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017), ISBN 9780190226428, eISBN 9780190630553.
dc.description.abstractThroughout his authorship, Kierkegaard shows an intense fascination with Socrates and Socratic self-knowledge. This chapter traces, in roughly chronological order: (1) the young Kierkegaard’s autobiographical reflections on self-knowledge, when first coming to understand his task as an author; (2) Socrates as a negative figure in The Concept of Irony - where self-knowledge is understood in terms of separation from others and the surrounding society - and the contrast with the Concluding Unscientific Postscript’s treatment of Socrates as an exemplary “subjective thinker”; (3) in Either/Or, the connection between self-knowledge and self-transparency, and the link between self-knowledge and “choosing oneself”, understood as willing receptivity; (4) in writings such as The Concept of Anxiety and The Sickness Unto Death, the importance of sin and our utter dependence upon God for the question of whether self-knowledge is ever really possible; and (5) in Judge for Yourself! and related journal entries, a more precise specification of what Christian self-knowledge might amount to. I aim to show that, in his account of self-knowledge as much as elsewhere, treatments of Kierkegaard as a proto-existentialist risk misleadingly downplaying the deeply and explicitly Christian nature of his thought.en
dc.format.extent18
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherOUP
dc.relation.ispartofSelf-Knowledge: A History
dc.relation.ispartofseriesOxford Philosophical Concepts
dc.rightsOpen
dc.subjectKierkegaard
dc.subjectSelf-knowledge
dc.subjectSocrates
dc.subjectSocratic
dc.titleSelf-knowledge in Kierkegaarden
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Humanities
dc.contributor.institutionSocial Sciences, Arts & Humanities Research Institute
dc.contributor.institutionPhilosophy
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Humanities
dc.description.versiontypeSubmitted Version
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-01-05
rioxxterms.versionSMUR
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190226411.003.0014
rioxxterms.typeOther
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeOpen


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