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dc.contributor.authorKapetanaki, Ariadni
dc.contributor.authorBrennan, David
dc.contributor.authorEagle, Lynne
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-04T16:30:22Z
dc.date.available2017-07-04T16:30:22Z
dc.date.issued2017-07-04
dc.identifier.citationKapetanaki , A , Brennan , D & Eagle , L 2017 , ' Sustainability in the Business & Marketing Curriculum:  : Exploratory Study ' , Paper presented at Freedom Through Marketing: Looking Back, Going Forward , Hull , United Kingdom , 3/07/17 - 6/07/17 .
dc.identifier.citationconference
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 11624845
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 747a3086-5b20-4965-819f-764237cdbb6d
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0001-9896-6978/work/38698699
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-7179-2960/work/62750335
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/18765
dc.descriptionAriadni Kapetanaki, Ross Brennan, and Lynne Eagle, ‘Sustainability in the Business & Marketing Curriculum: Exploratory Study'. Paper presented at the 50th Academy of Marketing Conference, Freedom Through Marketing: Looking Back, Going Forward, 3-6 July 2017, Hull University Business School, Hull, UK.
dc.description.abstractThe first sentence of the call for papers for the Academy of Marketing Conference 2017 asserts that marketing is increasingly seen as a force for good, particularly in connection with building awareness of environmental issues and sustainability. In this paper we focus on the education of business students, and particularly marketing students, in issues to do with sustainability. The primary purpose of this paper is to report on an empirical investigation of the beliefs and perceptions of our own students with respect to sustainability. This investigation is planned to be a benchmark study, so that we can track changes in students’ beliefs and perceptions as sustainability issues are further embedded within the curriculum. While environmental sustainability has been a matter of widespread interest and concern for many years, the 2015 Paris Agreement within the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) can be regarded as the most significant development in recent history. In October 2016 the Paris agreement achieved entry into force, having been ratified by 109 of the 197 Parties to the Convention. The central aim of the Paris Agreement is to strengthen the global response to the threat of climate change; the goal is to restrict global temperature rise to no more than 2 degrees Celsius this century, while making efforts to restrict global temperature rise to no more than 1.5 degrees Celsius (UN, 2015). Given the prominence received by sustainability at the political level, it is not surprising that business schools are being encouraged to include it explicitly within the curriculum. Business school accrediting bodies mandate the inclusion of sustainability in the business curriculum (see appendix for extracts from accrediting body requirements).en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.titleSustainability in the Business & Marketing Curriculum:  : Exploratory Studyen
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Research on Management, Economy and Society
dc.contributor.institutionEnterprise and Value Research Group
dc.contributor.institutionHertfordshire Business School
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Marketing and Enterprise
dc.contributor.institutionWeight and Obesity Research Group
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.date.embargoedUntil2017-07-04
dc.identifier.urlhttps://www.academyofmarketing.org/conference/conference-2017/
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.typeOther
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


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