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dc.contributor.authorCarpenter, Lewis
dc.contributor.authorNikiphorou, Elena
dc.contributor.authorSharpe, Rachel
dc.contributor.authorNorton, Sam
dc.contributor.authorRennie, Kirsten
dc.contributor.authorBunn, Frances
dc.contributor.authorScott, David
dc.contributor.authorDixey, Josh
dc.contributor.authorYoung, Adam
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-02T17:56:48Z
dc.date.available2017-11-02T17:56:48Z
dc.date.issued2016-06-01
dc.identifier.citationCarpenter , L , Nikiphorou , E , Sharpe , R , Norton , S , Rennie , K , Bunn , F , Scott , D , Dixey , J & Young , A 2016 , ' Have Radiographic Progression Rates in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Changed? A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Long-term Cohorts ' , Rheumatology , vol. 55 , no. 6 , pp. 1053-1065 . https://doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/kew004
dc.identifier.issn1462-0324
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 9616135
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 79500328-dd05-454d-9b53-2db74a9de0ed
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84974824290
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/19481
dc.descriptionThis is a pre-copyedited, author-produced version of an article accepted for publication in Rheumatology following peer review. The version of record: Lewis Carpenter, et al, ‘Have radiographic progression rates in early rheumatoid arthritis changed? A systematic review and meta-analysis of long-term cohorts’ Rheumatology, Vol. 55(6): 1053-1065, 1 June 2016, is available online at DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/kew004.
dc.description.abstractThe objectives of this systematic review are to evaluate firstly, all published data on baseline and annual progression rates of radiographic damage from all longitudinal observational cohorts, and secondly, the association of standard clinical and laboratory parameters with long-term radiographic joint damage.MethodsA comprehensive search of the literature from 1975 to 2014, using PubMed, SCOPUS and Cochrane databases, identified a total of 28 studies that investigated long-term radiographic progression, and 41 studies investigating predictors of long-term radiographic progression. This was submitted and approved by PROSPERO in February 2014 (Registration Number: CRD42014007589).ResultsMeta-analysis indicated an overall baseline rate of 2.02%, and a yearly increase of 1.08% of maximum damage. Stratified analysis found that baseline radiographic scores did not differ significantly between cohorts recruiting patient’s pre and post 1990 (2.01% vs. 2.03%; p>0.01), however the annual rate of progression was significantly reduced in the post 1990 cohorts (0.68% vs. 1.50%; p<0.05). High levels of acute phase markers, baseline radiographic damage, anti-CCP and Rheumatoid Factor positivity remain consistently predictive of long-term radiographic joint damage. Conclusions: Critical changes in treatment practices over the last three decades are likely to explain the reduction in the long-term progression of structural joint damage. Acute phase markers and presence of Rheumatoid Factor/anti-CCP are strongly associated with increased radiographic progression.en
dc.format.extent13
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofRheumatology
dc.rightsEmbargoed
dc.subjectRheumatoid arthritis
dc.subjectsystematic review
dc.subjectMeta-analysis
dc.subjectRadiographic Damage
dc.titleHave Radiographic Progression Rates in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Changed? : A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Long-term Cohortsen
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Lifespan and Chronic Illness Research
dc.contributor.institutionHealth Services and Medicine
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology and Sports Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionHealth Research Methods Unit
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Health Services and Clinical Research
dc.contributor.institutionBasic and Clinical Science Unit
dc.contributor.institutionHealth & Human Sciences Research Institute
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Postgraduate Medicine
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Adult Nursing and Primary Care
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Health and Social Work
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Research in Public Health and Community Care
dc.contributor.institutionEvidence Based Practice
dc.contributor.institutionNursing, Midwifery and Social Work
dc.contributor.institutionOlder People's Health and Complex Conditions
dc.contributor.institutionWeight and Obesity Research Group
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.date.embargoedUntil2017-03-08
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Health and Social Work
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Accepted Version
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-06-01
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/kew004
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-03-08
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.date.embargo2017-03-08
herts.rights.accesstypeEmbargoed


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