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dc.contributor.authorMcDougall, Kirsty
dc.contributor.authorDuckworth, Martin
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-30T22:29:13Z
dc.date.available2018-01-30T22:29:13Z
dc.date.issued2017-12-31
dc.identifier.citationMcDougall , K & Duckworth , M 2017 , ' Profiling fluency: an analysis of individual variation in disfluencies in adult males ' , Speech Communication , vol. 95 , pp. 16-27 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.specom.2017.10.001
dc.identifier.issn0167-6393
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 12491411
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 46622f2c-3bfd-43c1-a33f-93e574239bc0
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85031827382
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/19667
dc.descriptionThis document is the Accepted Manuscript version of the following article: Kirsty McDougall, and Martin Duckworth, ‘Profiling fluency: An analysis of individual variation in disfluencies in adult males’, Speech Communication, Vol. 95:16-27, December 2017, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.specom.2017.10.001. Under embargo. Embargo end date: 10 April 2019. This manuscript version is made available under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License CC BY NC-ND 4.0, (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ ), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, and is not altered, transformed, or built upon in any way.
dc.description.abstractIndividual variation in non-fluency behaviour in normally fluent (NF) adults, is investigated. Differences among speakers in the usage of a range of features such as filled and silent pauses, sound prolongations, repetition of phrases, words or part-words, and self-interruptions is explored in the spontaneous speech of 20 male speakers of Standard Southern British English from the DyViS database. The speech analysed is semi-spontaneous, and taken from a simulated police interview task. A taxonomy of fluency features for forensic analysis (TOFFA) was applied to this speech data. The rate of occurrence of each feature per 100 syllables is calculated for each speaker. Results show that individuals vary considerably in the rates of these fluency features occurring in their speech and that between-speaker differences are present in the types of features speakers produce. Implications of the significance of these findings for forensic phonetics are discussed.en
dc.format.extent10
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofSpeech Communication
dc.subjectfluency behaviour
dc.subjectdisfluency features
dc.subjectTOFFA
dc.subjectindividual differences
dc.subjectspeaker-specificity
dc.titleProfiling fluency: an analysis of individual variation in disfluencies in adult malesen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Humanities
dc.contributor.institutionEnglish Language and Communication
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.date.embargoedUntil2019-04-10
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.specom.2017.10.001
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


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