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dc.contributor.authorBristowe, Katherine
dc.contributor.authorHodson, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorWee, Bee
dc.contributor.authorAlmack, Kathryn
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Katherine
dc.contributor.authorDaveson, Barbara A
dc.contributor.authorKoffman, Jonathan
dc.contributor.authorMcEnhill, Linda
dc.contributor.authorHarding, Richard
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-07T17:43:23Z
dc.date.available2018-02-07T17:43:23Z
dc.date.issued2018-01-01
dc.identifier.citationBristowe , K , Hodson , M , Wee , B , Almack , K , Johnson , K , Daveson , B A , Koffman , J , McEnhill , L & Harding , R 2018 , ' Recommendations to reduce inequalities for LGBT people facing advanced illness : ACCESSCare national qualitative interview study ' , Palliative Medicine , vol. 32 , no. 1 , pp. 23-35 . https://doi.org/10.1177/0269216317705102
dc.identifier.issn0269-2163
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 12063253
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 9f7644a3-2590-4535-bb9d-18e88f642e8d
dc.identifier.otherPubMed: 28502218
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85034441528
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/19746
dc.descriptionThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 License (http://www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits non-commercial use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access pages (https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage).
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Lesbian, gay, bisexual and/or trans (LGBT) people have higher risk of certain life-limiting illnesses and unmet needs in advanced illness and bereavement. ACCESSCare is the first national study to examine in depth the experiences of LGBT people facing advanced illness. AIM: To explore health-care experiences of LGBT people facing advanced illness to elicit views regarding sharing identity (sexual orientation/gender history), accessing services, discrimination/exclusion and best-practice examples. DESIGN: Semi-structured in-depth qualitative interviews analysed using thematic analysis. SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: In total, 40 LGBT people from across the United Kingdom facing advanced illness: cancer ( n = 21), non-cancer ( n = 16) and both a cancer and a non-cancer conditions ( n = 3). RESULTS: In total, five main themes emerged: (1) person-centred care needs that may require additional/different consideration for LGBT people (including different social support structures and additional legal concerns), (2) service level or interactional (created in the consultation) barriers/stressors (including heteronormative assumptions and homophobic/transphobic behaviours), (3) invisible barriers/stressors (including the historical context of pathology/criminalisation, fears and experiences of discrimination) and (4) service level or interactional facilitators (including acknowledging and including partners in critical discussions). These all shape (5) individuals' preferences for disclosing identity. Prior experiences of discrimination or violence, in response to disclosure, were carried into future care interactions and heightened with the frailty of advanced illness. CONCLUSION: Despite recent legislative change, experiences of discrimination and exclusion in health care persist for LGBT people. Ten recommendations, for health-care professionals and services/institutions, are made from the data. These are simple, low cost and offer potential gains in access to, and outcomes of, care for LGBT people.en
dc.format.extent13
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofPalliative Medicine
dc.subjectJournal Article
dc.titleRecommendations to reduce inequalities for LGBT people facing advanced illness : ACCESSCare national qualitative interview studyen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Health and Social Work
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1177/0269216317705102
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


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