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dc.contributor.authorJiménez-Iglesias, Antonia
dc.contributor.authorGarcía-Moya, Irene
dc.contributor.authorMoreno, Carmen
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-13T17:15:11Z
dc.date.available2018-02-13T17:15:11Z
dc.date.issued2017-12-15
dc.identifier.citationJiménez-Iglesias , A , García-Moya , I & Moreno , C 2017 , ' Parent–child relationships and adolescents’ life satisfaction across the first decade of the new millennium ' , Family Relations , vol. 66 , no. 3 , pp. 512-526 . https://doi.org/10.1111/fare.12249
dc.identifier.issn0197-6664
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 13226188
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 9f2f3386-61be-43d1-a691-433f98d4998a
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85038848245
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/19776
dc.descriptionThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Antonia Jiménez-Iglesias, Irene GarcÍa-Moya, and Carmen Moreno, ‘Parent–Child Relationships and Adolescents' Life Satisfaction Across the First Decade of the New Millennium’, Family Relations, Vol. 66 (3): 512-526, July 2017, which has been published in final form at: https://doi.org/10.1111/fare.12249. Under embargo until 31 July 2018. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
dc.description.abstractObjective: To examine whether changes occurred in parent–child relationships (maternal and paternal affection, ease of communication with the mother and father, maternal and paternal knowledge, and family activities) between 2002 and 2010 in boys and girls and to examine the contributions of these family dimensions to life satisfaction. Background: Although parent–child relationships may be affected by social change, there are few investigations of change in parent–child relationships over time. Method: The sample consisted of 46,593 adolescents between 11 to 18 years of age who participated in the 2002, 2006, or 2010 editions of the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study in Spain. Trend analysis including univariate analyses of variance (ANOVAs) and factorial ANOVAs were conducted separately for boys and girls, and effect size tests were calculated. Results: Communication with fathers and family activities statistically increased across HBSC editions and parent–child relationships were positively associated with life satisfaction across the examined period. Conclusion: There were small positive changes in some family dimensions, and some of them were increasingly important for adolescent life satisfaction over time. Implications: Interventions for strengthening parent-child relationships and promoting adolescent well-being should include mothers and fathers and emphasize affection, communication, and family activities.en
dc.format.extent15
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofFamily Relations
dc.subjectAdolescence
dc.subjectCross-sequential analysis
dc.subjectFamily dimensions
dc.subjectLife satisfaction
dc.subjectParent–child relationships
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectDevelopmental and Educational Psychology
dc.subjectSocial Sciences (miscellaneous)
dc.titleParent–child relationships and adolescents’ life satisfaction across the first decade of the new millenniumen
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Research in Public Health and Community Care
dc.contributor.institutionHealth, Young People and Family Lives
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Health and Social Work
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.date.embargoedUntil2018-07-31
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85038848245&partnerID=8YFLogxK
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1111/fare.12249
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


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