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dc.contributor.authorSchelletter, Christina
dc.contributor.authorLeinonen, E.
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-14T10:19:08Z
dc.date.available2008-05-14T10:19:08Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifier.citationSchelletter , C & Leinonen , E 2003 , ' Normal and language-impaired children's use of reference: syntactic vs pragmatic processing ' , Clinical Linguistics and Phonetics , vol. 17 , no. 4-5 , pp. 335-43 .
dc.identifier.issn0269-9206
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 108858
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 24c97da1-ae81-4d84-a964-296d4f58e6a5
dc.identifier.otherdspace: 2299/2015
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 0042122348
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/2015
dc.description.abstractThe present study investigates children's syntactic and pragmatic processing when specifying referents presented in short video clips. Within Relevance theory, the assumption of 'optimal relevance' implies that utterances are intended to involve the least processing effort on the part of the listener. In the present context, lexically specified NPs are assumed to be more in line with optimal relevance than pronouns. Subjects were 48 normally developing children aged 3;4-8;10 and 30 SLI children aged 5;1-8;9, divided into a low and a normal MLU group. Children's responses were coded according to levels of pragmatic processing and syntactic positions. Normally developing children's referent specifications were found to be increasingly relevant with increasing age. Differences between SLI and normal children were only found for the low MLU group with SLI who used fewer pronouns than the younger children, thereby showing that syntactic limitations alone cannot account for children's specification of referents.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Linguistics and Phonetics
dc.rightsOpen
dc.subjectReferent specification
dc.subjectpragmatic processing,
dc.subjectgiven-new strategy,
dc.subjectRelevance Theory,
dc.subjectlanguage impairment.
dc.titleNormal and language-impaired children's use of reference: syntactic vs pragmatic processingen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Humanities
dc.contributor.institutionSocial Sciences, Arts & Humanities Research Institute
dc.contributor.institutionEnglish Literature and Creative Writing
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Humanities
dcterms.dateAccepted2003
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeOpen


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