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dc.contributor.authorHowlett, Neil
dc.contributor.authorTrivedi, Daksha
dc.contributor.authorTroop, Nicholas
dc.contributor.authorChater, Angel
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-20T14:48:07Z
dc.date.available2018-06-20T14:48:07Z
dc.date.issued2019-01-01
dc.identifier.citationHowlett , N , Trivedi , D , Troop , N & Chater , A 2019 , ' Are physical activity interventions for healthy inactive adults effective in promoting behavior change and maintenance, and which behavior change techniques are effective? A systematic review and meta-analysis ' , Translational Behavioral Medicine , vol. 9 , no. 1 , iby010 , pp. 147-157 . https://doi.org/10.1093/tbm/iby010
dc.identifier.issn1869-6716
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 9882651
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: b4aa5da3-44fd-4831-a967-6f0dc872192a
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85051979858
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/20185
dc.description© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Behavioral Medicine. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@oup.com
dc.description.abstractPhysical inactivity and sedentary behavior relate to poor health outcomes independently. Healthy inactive adults are a key target population for prevention. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of physical activity and/or sedentary behavior interventions, measured postintervention (behavior change) and at follow-up (behavior change maintenance), to identify behavior change techniques (BCT) within, and report on fidelity. Included studies were randomized controlled trials, targeting healthy inactive adults, aiming to change physical activity and/or sedentary behavior, with a minimum postintervention follow-up of 6 months, using 16 databases from 1990. Two reviewers independently coded risk of bias, the "Template for Intervention Description and Replication" (TIDieR) checklist, and BCTs. Twenty-six studies were included; 16 pooled for meta-analysis. Physical activity interventions were effective at changing behavior (d = 0.32, 95% confidence intervals = 0.16-0.48, n = 2,346) and maintaining behavior change after 6 months or more (d = 0.21, 95% confidence intervals = 0.12-0.30, n = 2,190). Sedentary behavior interventions (n = 2) were not effective. At postintervention, physical activity intervention effectiveness was associated with the BCTs "Biofeedback," "Demonstration of the behavior," "Behavior practice/rehearsal," and "Graded tasks." At follow-up, effectiveness was associated with using "Action planning," "Instruction on how to perform the behavior," "Prompts/cues," "Behavior practice/rehearsal," "Graded tasks," and "Self-reward." Fidelity was only documented in one study. Good evidence was found for behavior change maintenance effects in healthy inactive adults, and underlying BCTs. This review provides translational evidence to improve research, intervention design, and service delivery in physical activity interventions, while highlighting the lack of fidelity measurement.en
dc.format.extent11
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofTranslational Behavioral Medicine
dc.subjectBehavior change
dc.subjectBehavior change maintenance
dc.subjectBehavior change techniques
dc.subjectInactive lifestyle
dc.subjectPhysical activity
dc.subjectSystematic review
dc.subjectApplied Psychology
dc.subjectBehavioral Neuroscience
dc.titleAre physical activity interventions for healthy inactive adults effective in promoting behavior change and maintenance, and which behavior change techniques are effective? A systematic review and meta-analysisen
dc.contributor.institutionPsychology
dc.contributor.institutionBehaviour Change in Health and Business
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology and Sports Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Research in Psychology and Sport Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Health and Social Work
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Adult Nursing and Primary Care
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Research in Public Health and Community Care
dc.contributor.institutionNursing, Midwifery and Social Work
dc.contributor.institutionEvidence Based Practice
dc.contributor.institutionPatient Experience and Public Involvement
dc.contributor.institutionOlder People's Health and Complex Conditions
dc.contributor.institutionHealth and Clinical Psychology Research Group
dc.contributor.institutionBasic and Clinical Science Unit
dc.contributor.institutionWeight and Obesity Research Group
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85051979858&partnerID=8YFLogxK
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1093/tbm/iby010
rioxxterms.typeOther
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


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