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dc.contributor.authorJenkinson, Paul M
dc.contributor.authorPreston, Catherine
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-16T00:10:34Z
dc.date.available2018-08-16T00:10:34Z
dc.date.issued2017-01-04
dc.identifier.citationJenkinson , P M & Preston , C 2017 , ' The 'not-so-strange' body in the mirror: A principal components analysis of direct and mirror self-observation ' , Consciousness and cognition , vol. 48 , pp. 262-272 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.concog.2016.12.007
dc.identifier.issn1053-8100
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 10912906
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: b8c783f7-d1c2-4d2e-8ebb-821a1b3e63bc
dc.identifier.otherPubMed: 28061429
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85007553661
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0001-6887-0457/work/32418392
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/20355
dc.descriptionThis document is the Accepted Manuscript version of the following article: Paul M. Jenkinson, and Catherine Preston, ‘The “not-so-strange” body in the mirror: A principal components analysis of direct and mirror self-observation’, Consciousness and Cognition, Vol. 48, pp. 262-272, first published online 4 January 2017, doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.concog.2016.12.007 This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/.
dc.description.abstractIn this study we adopted a psychometric approach to examine how the body is subjectively experienced in a mirror. One hundred and twenty-four healthy participants viewed their body for five minutes directly or via a mirror, and then completed a 20-item questionnaire designed to capture subjective experiences of the body. PCA revealed a two-component structure for both direct and mirror conditions, comprising body evaluations (and alienation) and unusual feelings and perceptions. The relationship between these components and pre-existing tendencies for appearance anxiety, body dysmorphic-type beliefs, dissociative symptomatology, self-objectification and delusion ideation further supported the similarity between direct and mirror conditions; however, the occurrence of strange experiences like those reported to occur during prolonged face viewing was not confirmed. These results suggest that, despite obvious differences in visual feedback, observing the body via a mirror (as an outside observer) is subjectively equivalent to observing the body directly (from our own viewpoint).en
dc.format.extent11
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofConsciousness and cognition
dc.subjectmirror
dc.subjectbody experience
dc.subjectprincipal components analysis
dc.subjectself-observation
dc.titleThe 'not-so-strange' body in the mirror: : A principal components analysis of direct and mirror self-observationen
dc.contributor.institutionPsychology
dc.contributor.institutionCognitive Neuropsychology
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology and Sports Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Research in Psychology and Sport Sciences
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.date.embargoedUntil2018-01-04
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.concog.2016.12.007
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


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