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dc.contributor.authorNiedzwienska, Agnieszka
dc.contributor.authorKvavilashvili, Lia
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-16T00:16:03Z
dc.date.available2018-08-16T00:16:03Z
dc.date.issued2018-09-01
dc.identifier.citationNiedzwienska , A & Kvavilashvili , L 2018 , ' Reduced mind-wandering in Mild Cognitive Impairment: Testing the spontaneous retrieval deficit hypothesis ' , Neuropsychology , vol. 32 , no. 6 , pp. 711-723 . https://doi.org/10.1037/neu0000457
dc.identifier.issn0894-4105
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 13432267
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 84154d1f-3d1b-481b-b5f1-b633f76c01d2
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85049151050
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/20427
dc.description© American Psychological Association, 2018. This paper is not the copy of record and may not exactly replicate the authoritative document published in the APA journal. Please do not copy or cite without author's permission. The final article is available, upon publication, at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/neu0000457
dc.description.abstractObjective: Research on early cognitive markers of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is primarily focused on declarative episodic memory tests that involve deliberate and effortful/strategic processes at retrieval. The present study tested the spontaneous retrieval deficit hypothesis, which predicts that people with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), who are at increased risk of developing AD, are particularly impaired on tasks that rely on spontaneous retrieval processes. Method: Twenty-three participants with aMCI and 25 healthy controls (HC) completed an easy vigilance task and thought probes (reporting what was going through their mind), which were categorized as spontaneous thoughts about the past (i.e., involuntary memories), current situation, and future (i.e., spontaneous prospection). Results: Participants with aMCI reported significantly fewer spontaneous thoughts or mind-wandering than HC. This effect was driven by significantly fewer involuntary memories, although groups did not differ in the number of current and future thoughts. Conclusions: Findings provide strong support for the spontaneous retrieval deficit hypothesis. Implications for research on mind-wandering and the default network, early cognitive markers of the disease, and our theoretical understanding of the nature of cognitive deficits in AD are discussed.en
dc.format.extent13
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofNeuropsychology
dc.rightsOpen
dc.subjectAlzheimer's disease
dc.subjectEarly cognitive marker
dc.subjectInvoluntary memories
dc.subjectMild cognitive impairment
dc.subjectMind-wandering
dc.subjectNeuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
dc.titleReduced mind-wandering in Mild Cognitive Impairment: Testing the spontaneous retrieval deficit hypothesisen
dc.contributor.institutionPsychology
dc.contributor.institutionLearning, Memory and Thinking
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology and Sports Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Research in Psychology and Sport Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85049151050&partnerID=8YFLogxK
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Accepted Version
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-09-01
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1037/neu0000457
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeOpen


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