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dc.contributor.authorVázquez-Semadeni, Enrique
dc.contributor.authorZamora-Avilés, Manuel
dc.contributor.authorGalván-Madrid, Roberto
dc.contributor.authorForbrich, Jan
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-16T00:18:08Z
dc.date.available2018-08-16T00:18:08Z
dc.date.issued2018-09-21
dc.identifier.citationVázquez-Semadeni , E , Zamora-Avilés , M , Galván-Madrid , R & Forbrich , J 2018 , ' Molecular Cloud Evolution VI. Measuring cloud ages ' , Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society , vol. 479 , no. 3 , pp. 3254–3263 . https://doi.org/10.1093/mnras/sty1586
dc.identifier.issn0035-8711
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 15021464
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 2f1cf197-f48d-42e1-a87e-92dd3852117b
dc.identifier.otherArXiv: http://arxiv.org/abs/1805.07221v1
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85051551346
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0001-8694-4966/work/62751205
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/20460
dc.descriptionThis article has been published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Royal Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.
dc.description.abstractIn previous contributions, we have presented an analytical model describing the evolution and star formation rate (SFR) of molecular clouds (MCs) undergoing hierarchical gravitational contraction. The cloud’s evolution is characterized by an initial increase in its mass, density, SFR, and star formation efficiency (SFE), as it contracts, followed by a decrease of these quantities as newly formed massive stars begin to disrupt the cloud. The main parameter of the model is the maximum mass reached by the cloud during its evolution. Thus, specifying the instantaneous mass and some other variable completely determines the cloud’s evolutionary stage. We apply the model to interpret the observed scatter in SFEs of the cloud sample compiled by Lada et al. as an evolutionary effect so that, although clouds such as California and Orion A have similar masses, they are in very different evolutionary stages, causing their very different observed SFRs and SFEs. The model predicts that the California cloud will eventually reach a significantly larger total mass than the Orion A cloud. Next, we apply the model to derive estimated ages of the clouds since the time when approximately 25 per cent of their mass had become molecular. We find ages from ∼1.5 to 27 Myr, with the most inactive clouds being the youngest. Further predictions of the model are that clouds with very low SFEs should have massive atomic envelopes constituting the majority of their gravitational mass, and that low-mass clouds (M ∼ 103–104M⊙) end their lives with a mini-burst of star formation, reaching SFRs ∼300–500M⊙ Myr−1. By this time, they have contracted to become compact (∼1 pc) massive star-forming clumps, in general embedded within larger giant molecular clouds.en
dc.format.extent10
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofMonthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
dc.rightsOpen
dc.subjectISM: clouds
dc.subjectISM: evolution
dc.subjectISM: kinematics and dynamics
dc.subjectISM: structure
dc.subjectStars: formation
dc.subjectAstronomy and Astrophysics
dc.subjectSpace and Planetary Science
dc.titleMolecular Cloud Evolution VI. Measuring cloud agesen
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Astrophysics Research
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85051551346&partnerID=8YFLogxK
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Published version
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-09-21
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1093/mnras/sty1586
rioxxterms.licenseref.uriOther
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeOpen


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