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dc.contributor.authorLaws, Keith R.
dc.contributor.authorDarlington, Nicole
dc.contributor.authorKondel, Tejinder K.
dc.contributor.authorMcKenna, Peter J.
dc.contributor.authorJauhar, Sameer
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-17T14:52:11Z
dc.date.available2018-08-17T14:52:11Z
dc.date.issued2018-07-17
dc.identifier.citationLaws , K R , Darlington , N , Kondel , T K , McKenna , P J & Jauhar , S 2018 , ' Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for schizophrenia - outcomes for functioning, distress and quality of life : A meta-analysis ' , BMC Psychology , vol. 6 , no. 1 , 32 . https://doi.org/10.1186/s40359-018-0243-2
dc.identifier.issn2050-7283
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 15128348
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 8d227538-58a0-42dc-919c-0021314c2307
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85050147074
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0002-2505-1256/work/79522426
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/20470
dc.description.abstractBackground: The effect of cognitive behavioural therapy for psychosis (CBTp) on the core symptoms of schizophrenia has proven contentious, with current meta-analyses finding at most only small effects. However, it has been suggested that the effects of CBTp in areas other than psychotic symptoms are at least as important and potentially benefit from the intervention. Method: We meta-analysed RCTs investigating the effectiveness of CBTp for functioning, distress and quality of life in individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia and related disorders. Data from 36 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) met our inclusion criteria- 27 assessing functioning (1579 participants); 8 for distress (465 participants); and 10 for quality of life (592 participants). Results: The pooled effect size for functioning was small but significant for the end-of-trial (0.25: 95% CI: 0.14 to 0.33); however, this became non-significant at follow-up (0.10 [95%CI -0.07 to 0.26]). Although a small benefit of CBT was evident for reducing distress (0.37: 95%CI 0.05 to 0.69), this became nonsignificant when adjusted for possible publication bias (0.18: 95%CI -0.12 to 0.48). Finally, CBTp showed no benefit for improving quality of life (0.04: 95% CI: -0.12 to 0.19). Conclusions: CBTp has a small therapeutic effect on functioning at end-of-trial, although this benefit is not evident at follow-up. Although CBTp produced a small benefit on distress, this was subject to possible publication bias and became nonsignificant when adjusted. We found no evidence that CBTp increases quality of life post-intervention.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Psychology
dc.rightsOpen
dc.subjectCognitive Behavioral Therapy
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectQuality of Life/psychology
dc.subjectSchizophrenia/therapy
dc.subjectSchizophrenic Psychology
dc.subjectTreatment Outcome
dc.titleCognitive Behavioural Therapy for schizophrenia - outcomes for functioning, distress and quality of life : A meta-analysisen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Hertfordshire
dc.contributor.institutionOlder People's Health and Complex Conditions
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85050147074&partnerID=8YFLogxK
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Published version
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-07-17
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1186/s40359-018-0243-2
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeOpen


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