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dc.contributor.authorCotton, Daniel V.
dc.contributor.authorBailey, Jeremy A.
dc.contributor.authorHowarth, Ian D.
dc.contributor.authorBott, Kimberly
dc.contributor.authorKedziora-Chudczer, Lucyna
dc.contributor.authorLucas, P. W.
dc.contributor.authorHough, J. H.
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-17T14:52:26Z
dc.date.available2018-08-17T14:52:26Z
dc.date.issued2017-09-18
dc.identifier.citationCotton , D V , Bailey , J A , Howarth , I D , Bott , K , Kedziora-Chudczer , L , Lucas , P W & Hough , J H 2017 , ' Polarization due to rotational distortion in the bright star Regulus ' , Nature Astronomy , vol. 1 . https://doi.org/10.1038/s41550-017-0238-6
dc.identifier.issn2397-3366
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 15173724
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 195b3917-4ca1-4583-8d88-afeae2de2f60
dc.identifier.otherArXiv: http://arxiv.org/abs/1804.06576v1
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85037119274
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/20473
dc.descriptionThis is the full published article (retrieved from the 6 months post-publication posting on arXiv) including the Methods and Supplementary Information sections: 33 pages, 10 figures, 8 tables
dc.description.abstractPolarization in stars was first predicted by Chandrasekhar [1] who calculated a substantial linear polarization at the stellar limb for a pure electron-scattering atmosphere. This polarization will average to zero when integrated over a spherical star but could be detected if the symmetry is broken, for example by the eclipse of a binary companion. Nearly 50 years ago, Harrington and Collins [2] modeled another way of breaking the symmetry and producing net polarization - the distortion of a rapidly rotating hot star. Here we report the first detection of this effect. Observations of the linear polarization of Regulus, with two different high-precision polarimeters, range from +42 parts-per-million (ppm) at a wavelength of 741 nm to -22 ppm at 395 nm. The reversal from red to blue is a distinctive feature of rotation-induced polarization. Using a new set of models for the polarization of rapidly rotating stars we find that Regulus is rotating at 96.5(+0.6/-0.8)% of its critical angular velocity for breakup, and has an inclination greater than 76.5 degrees. The rotation axis of the star is at a position angle of 79.5+/-0.7 degrees. The conclusions are independent of, but in good agreement with, the results of previously published interferometric observations of Regulus [3]. The accurate measurement of rotation in early-type stars is important for understanding their stellar environments [4], and course of their evolution [5].en
dc.format.extent33
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofNature Astronomy
dc.rightsOpen
dc.subjectastro-ph.SR
dc.titlePolarization due to rotational distortion in the bright star Regulusen
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Astrophysics Research
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Accepted Version
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-09-18
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1038/s41550-017-0238-6
rioxxterms.licenseref.uriOther
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeOpen


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