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dc.contributor.authorGavinho, Bruno
dc.contributor.authorRossi, Izadora
dc.contributor.authorEvans-Osses, Ingrid
dc.contributor.authorInal, Jameel
dc.contributor.authorRamirez, Marcel Ivan
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-08T00:18:38Z
dc.date.available2018-09-08T00:18:38Z
dc.date.issued2018-10-01
dc.identifier.citationGavinho , B , Rossi , I , Evans-Osses , I , Inal , J & Ramirez , M I 2018 , ' A new landscape of host–protozoa interactions involving the extracellular vesicles world ' , Parasitology , vol. 145 , no. 12 , pp. 1521-1530 . https://doi.org/10.1017/S0031182018001105
dc.identifier.issn0031-1820
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 15050202
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: f382259c-b9c6-42a5-a411-88b03bbc8c35
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85049829115
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/20533
dc.descriptionThis version is free to view and download for private research and study only. Not for re-distribution, re-sale or use in derivative works. © Cambridge University Press 2018
dc.description.abstractExtracellular vesicles (EVs) are released by a wide number of cells including blood cells, immune system cells, tumour cells, adult and embryonic stem cells. EVs are a heterogeneous group of vesicles (~30–1000 nm) including microvesicles and exosomes. The physiological release of EVs represents a normal state of the cell, raising a metabolic equilibrium between catabolic and anabolic processes. Moreover, when the cells are submitted to stress with different inducers or in pathological situations (malignancies, chronic diseases, infectious diseases.), they respond with an intense and dynamic release of EVs. The EVs released from stimulated cells vs those that are released constitutively may themselves differ, both physically and in their cargo. EVs contain protein, lipids, nucleic acids and biomolecules that can alter cell phenotypes or modulate neighbouring cells. In this review, we have summarized findings involving EVs in certain protozoan diseases. We have commented on strategies to study the communicative roles of EVs during host–pathogen interaction and hypothesized on the use of EVs for diagnostic, preventative and therapeutic purposes in infectious diseases. This kind of communication could modulate the innate immune system and reformulate concepts in parasitism. Moreover, the information provided within EVs could produce alternatives in translational medicine.en
dc.format.extent10
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofParasitology
dc.rightsEmbargoed
dc.subjectExosomes
dc.subjectextracellular vesicles
dc.subjectimmunology
dc.subjectmicrovesicles
dc.subjectprotozoan
dc.subjectParasitology
dc.subjectAnimal Science and Zoology
dc.subjectInfectious Diseases
dc.titleA new landscape of host–protozoa interactions involving the extracellular vesicles worlden
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biological and Environmental Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionBiosciences Research Group
dc.contributor.institutionExtracellular Vesicle Research Unit
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.date.embargoedUntil2019-01-10
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85049829115&partnerID=8YFLogxK
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Accepted Version
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-10-01
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1017/S0031182018001105
rioxxterms.licenseref.uriOther
rioxxterms.typeOther
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeEmbargoed


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