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dc.contributor.authorNorris, Dennis
dc.contributor.authorHall, Jane
dc.contributor.authorButterfield, Sally
dc.contributor.authorPage, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-04T01:08:38Z
dc.date.available2018-10-04T01:08:38Z
dc.date.issued2019-02-07
dc.identifier.citationNorris , D , Hall , J , Butterfield , S & Page , M 2019 , ' The effect of processing load on loss of information from short-term memory ' , Memory , vol. 27 , no. 2 , pp. 192-197 . https://doi.org/10.1080/09658211.2018.1497661
dc.identifier.issn0965-8211
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 15441404
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 8a27cbde-5f61-473c-b6e4-ca141480b6e9
dc.identifier.otherPubMed: 30001186
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85049775229
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/20686
dc.description.abstractWe report an experiment in which we varied the nature of the articulatory suppression task being performed during a filled retention interval in serial recall. During the retention interval participants performed one of three computer-paced colour naming tasks designed to prevent subvocal rehearsal: A Stroop color-interference task with items presented at a rate of one every 750 ms, and two color-consistent control tasks at a rate of either 750 ms or 500 ms per item. Memory performance over a 12 s interval declined much more dramatically with the Stroop task and the 500 ms control task than with the 750 ms control. There was no difference between the Stroop condition and the 500 ms control. These results pose problems for models that assume that loss of information from memory is determined entirely by interference, as there are more interfering events in the control 500 ms condition than the 750 ms Stroop. They also pose problems for models relying solely on time-based decay and articulatory rehearsal because all three conditions should block rehearsal and produce equivalent performance. The results illustrate that articulatory suppression tasks are not all equivalent, and suggest that the rate of decay from short-term memory is strongly influenced by the resource demands of concurrent processingen
dc.format.extent6
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofMemory
dc.subjectMemory
dc.subjectStroop
dc.subjectforgetting
dc.subjectshort-term memory
dc.subjectArts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
dc.subjectPsychology(all)
dc.titleThe effect of processing load on loss of information from short-term memoryen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology and Sports Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Research in Psychology and Sport Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionPsychology
dc.contributor.institutionLearning, Memory and Thinking
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85049775229&partnerID=8YFLogxK
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1080/09658211.2018.1497661
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


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