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dc.contributor.authorPower, Brian T
dc.contributor.authorKiezebrink, Kirsty
dc.contributor.authorAllan, Julia L
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Marion K
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-23T01:34:10Z
dc.date.available2018-10-23T01:34:10Z
dc.date.issued2014-11-14
dc.identifier.citationPower , B T , Kiezebrink , K , Allan , J L & Campbell , M K 2014 , ' Effects of workplace-based dietary and/or physical activity interventions for weight management targeting healthcare professionals : a systematic review of randomised controlled trials ' , BMC Obesity , vol. 1 , 23 . https://doi.org/10.1186/s40608-014-0023-3
dc.identifier.issn2052-9538
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 11631754
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 96a369a8-93fa-4afa-a091-f5bf099e66be
dc.identifier.otherPubMed: 26217510
dc.identifier.otherPubMedCentral: PMC4511014
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85033456444
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/20737
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: The prevalence of overweight and obesity is high amongst healthcare professionals and there is growing interest in delivering weight loss interventions in the workplace. We conducted a systematic review to (i) examine the effectiveness of workplace-based diet and/or physical activity interventions aimed at healthcare professionals and to (ii) identify and describe key components of effective interventions. Seven electronic databases were systematically searched. RESULTS: Thirteen randomised controlled trials met the inclusion criteria, of which seven had data available for meta-analysis. Where meta-analysis was possible, studies were grouped according to length of follow-up (<12 months and ≥12 months) and behavioural target (diet only, physical activity only or diet and physical activity), with outcome data pooled using a weighted random effects model. Nine studies reported statistically significant (between-group) differences. Four studies reported being informed by a behaviour change theory. Meta-analysis of all trials reporting weight data demonstrated healthcare professionals allocated to dietary and physical activity interventions lost significantly more body weight (-3.95 Kg, [95% CI -4.96 to- 2.95 Kg]) than controls up to 12 months follow up. CONCLUSIONS: Workplace diet and/or physical activity interventions targeting healthcare professionals are limited in number and are heterogeneous. To improve the evidence base, we recommend additional evaluations of theory-based interventions and adequate reporting of intervention content.en
dc.format.extent15
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Obesity
dc.subjectJournal Article
dc.titleEffects of workplace-based dietary and/or physical activity interventions for weight management targeting healthcare professionals : a systematic review of randomised controlled trialsen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biological and Environmental Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionFood Policy, Nutrition and Diet
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1186/s40608-014-0023-3
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


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