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dc.contributor.authorHarwood, Jeremy J.
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-17T15:15:10Z
dc.date.available2019-01-17T15:15:10Z
dc.date.issued2017-04-21
dc.identifier.citationHarwood , J J 2017 , ' Spectral ageing in the era of big data : Integrated versus resolved models ' , Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society , vol. 466 , no. 3 , pp. 2888-2894 . https://doi.org/10.1093/mnras/stw3318
dc.identifier.issn0035-8711
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 14959970
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: e585bbd1-55a9-4b26-8a67-585faf63b3c9
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85018351380
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/20984
dc.descriptionThis article has been accepted for publication in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Royal Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.
dc.description.abstractContinuous injection models of spectral ageing have long been used to determine the age of radio galaxies from their integrated spectrum; however, many questions about their reliability remain unanswered. With various large area surveys imminent (e.g. LOw Frequency ARray, MeerKAT, MurchisonWidefield Array) and planning for the next generation of radio interferometers are well underway (e.g. next generationVLA, SquareKilometreArray), investigations of radio galaxy physics are set to shift away from studies of individual sources to the population as a whole. Determining if and how integrated models of spectral ageing can be applied in the era of big data is therefore crucial. In this paper, I compare classical integrated models of spectral ageing to recent well-resolved studies that use modern analysis techniques on small spatial scales to determine their robustness and validity as a source selection method. I find that integrated models are unable to recover key parameters and, even when known a priori, provide a poor, frequency-dependent description of a source's spectrum. I show a disparity of up to a factor of 6 in age between the integrated and resolved methods but suggest, even with these inconsistencies, such models still provide a potential method of candidate selection in the search for remnant radio galaxies and in providing a cleaner selection of high redshift radio galaxies in z - α selected samples.en
dc.format.extent7
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofMonthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
dc.rights/dk/atira/pure/core/openaccesspermission/open
dc.subjectAcceleration of particles
dc.subjectGalaxies: active
dc.subjectGalaxies: jets
dc.subjectMethods: data analysis
dc.subjectRadiation mechanisms: non-thermal
dc.subjectRadio continuum: galaxies
dc.subjectAstronomy and Astrophysics
dc.subjectSpace and Planetary Science
dc.titleSpectral ageing in the era of big data : Integrated versus resolved modelsen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85018351380&partnerID=8YFLogxK
dc.identifier.urlhttps://arxiv.org/abs/1612.04390
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Accepted Version
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-12-16
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1093/mnras/stw3318
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeopenAccess


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