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dc.contributor.authorMatthews, Jordan
dc.contributor.authorPike, Elizabeth
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-21T15:00:31Z
dc.date.available2019-02-21T15:00:31Z
dc.date.issued2016-04-12
dc.identifier.citationMatthews , J & Pike , E 2016 , ' “What on earth are they doing in a racing car?”: Towards an Understanding of Women in Motorsport. ' , International Journal of the History of Sport , vol. 33 , no. 13 , pp. 1532-1550 . https://doi.org/10.1080/09523367.2016.1168811
dc.identifier.issn0952-3367
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 12373370
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: dc315657-1f7a-4113-8d7e-c5fbc2a12b5c
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 84963563005
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/21137
dc.description© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
dc.description.abstractMotorsport is an under-researched area of socio-historical study. There is particularly limited academic understanding of female involvement in the social world of motorsports. Therefore, this paper focuses on the role of the media in presenting and establishing motorsport for women. In particular, a documentary analysis of articles published by a UK national newspaper group from 1890, and a case study of an all-female UK-based motor-racing championship are used to account for gendered processes that have influenced attitudes and behaviours towards women motor racers. The motor car emerged through technological progress in an overtly masculine-dominated industrial period. Traditional assumptions and biologically deterministic attitudes towards women were used by men to position motoring and motor-racing as a male preserve. Newspaper reporting throughout the 1930s suggests an era of heightened success for women motor racers as a result of gaining access to a key resource in the form of Brooklands motor-racing circuit. Following the Second World War, there was increasing commercialization and professionalization of male-dominated motorsport, as well as renewed marginalization and trivialization of female participants within the newspapers. These processes continue to influence perceptions of women in contemporary motorsport.en
dc.format.extent19
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of the History of Sport
dc.rightsEmbargoed
dc.subjectBrooklands
dc.subjectFormula woman
dc.subjectgender
dc.subjectmedia
dc.subjectmotorsport
dc.title“What on earth are they doing in a racing car?”: Towards an Understanding of Women in Motorsport.en
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology and Sports Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionSport, Health and Exercise
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Research in Psychology and Sport Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionApplied Coaching and Leadership
dc.contributor.institutionHealth and Wellbeing
dc.contributor.institutionWeight and Obesity Research Group
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.date.embargoedUntil2017-10-12
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Accepted Version
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-04-12
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1080/09523367.2016.1168811
rioxxterms.licenseref.uriOther
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-10-12
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.date.embargo2017-10-12
herts.rights.accesstypeEmbargoed


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