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dc.contributor.authorWright, Hannah
dc.contributor.authorWellsted, David
dc.contributor.authorGratton, Jacqueline
dc.contributor.authorBesser, Sarah Jane
dc.contributor.authorMidgley, Nick
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-18T15:06:17Z
dc.date.available2019-03-18T15:06:17Z
dc.date.issued2019-01-22
dc.identifier.citationWright , H , Wellsted , D , Gratton , J , Besser , S J & Midgley , N 2019 , ' Use of the Strengths & Difficulties Questionnaire to identify treatment needs in looked after children referred to CAMHS ' , Developmental Child Welfare . https://doi.org/10.1177/2516103218817555
dc.identifier.issn2516-1032
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 15687182
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 247dfa24-3dd6-4c69-947e-0ce27ca91bff
dc.identifier.otherORCID: /0000-0003-3252-9665/work/62751004
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/21203
dc.description© The Author(s) 2019
dc.description.abstractBackground: In England and Wales, the Strengths & Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) is used to assess and monitor looked after children’s (LAC) mental health; and some targeted CAMHS teams use it to decide who can access services. However, the ability of the single-informant SDQ to identify LAC who need mental health treatment is insufficiently understood. Methods: 144 LAC referrals to a Targeted CAMHS Team were screened as part of a larger study. To establish how well the SDQ identified children who required treatment, Total Difficulties Scores (TDS) from single-informant SDQs submitted at referral were compared to treatment recommendations following routine CAMHS assessment in a real-world setting. To explain the results, clinicians (n=9) from the team were interviewed and key themes identified using Thematic Analysis. Results: Optimal accuracy calculations for SDQs completed by carers (TDS=17, sensitivity .67, specificity .57), teachers (TDS=17, sensitivity .79, specificity .71) and young people (TDS=14, sensitivity.79, specificity .42) compared to the outcome of routine CAMHS assessments indicated that the number of children whose treatment needs were not identified by their SDQ score may be unacceptably high. Key themes from clinician interviews identified possible gaps and limitations: Developmental Trauma and Attachment Difficulties, A different kind of ‘patient?’, Seeing the bad but neglecting the sad, and The importance of clinical judgement. Conclusions: Contrary to UK Government policy, this study suggests that the single-report SDQ should not be relied upon as a sole means of identifying mental health difficulties in this vulnerable, high-risk population.en
dc.format.extent18
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofDevelopmental Child Welfare
dc.titleUse of the Strengths & Difficulties Questionnaire to identify treatment needs in looked after children referred to CAMHSen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology and Sports Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Health Services and Clinical Research
dc.contributor.institutionBasic and Clinical Science Unit
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionHealth Research Methods Unit
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Research in Psychology and Sport Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionBehaviour Change in Health and Business
dc.contributor.institutionPsychology
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1177/2516103218817555
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


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