Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBarzykowski, Krystian
dc.contributor.authorRadel, Remi
dc.contributor.authorNiedzwienska, Agnieszka
dc.contributor.authorKvavilashvili, Lia
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-29T15:12:55Z
dc.date.available2019-03-29T15:12:55Z
dc.date.issued2018-11-27
dc.identifier.citationBarzykowski , K , Radel , R , Niedzwienska , A & Kvavilashvili , L 2018 , ' Why are we not flooded by involuntary thoughts about the past and future? Testing the cognitive inhibition dependency hypothesis ' , Psychological Research . https://doi.org/10.1007/s00426-018-1120-6
dc.identifier.issn0340-0727
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 16514403
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 8b104b23-845c-493f-a668-824a9ea61c33
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85057569493
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/21230
dc.description© The Author(s) 2018
dc.description.abstractIn everyday life, involuntary thoughts about future plans and events occur as often as involuntary thoughts about the past. However, compared to involuntary autobiographical memories (IAMs), such episodic involuntary future thoughts (IFTs) have become a focus of study only recently. The aim of the present investigation was to examine why we are not constantly ooded by IFTs and IAMs given that they are often triggered by incidental cues while performing undemanding activi- ties. One possibility is that activated thoughts are suppressed by the inhibitory control mechanism, and therefore depleting inhibitory control should enhance the frequency of both IFTs and IAMs. We report an experiment with a between-subjects design, in which participants in the depleted inhibition condition performed a 60-min high-con ict Stroop task before completing a laboratory vigilance task measuring the frequency of IFTs and IAMs. Participants in the intact inhibition condition performed a version of the Stroop task that did not deplete inhibitory control. To control for physical and mental fatigue resulting from performing the 60-min Stroop tasks in experimental conditions, participants in the control condition completed only the vigilance task. Contrary to predictions, the number of IFTs and IAMs reported during the vigilance task, using the probe-caught method, did not di er across conditions. However, manipulation checks showed that participants’ inhibitory resources were reduced in the depleted inhibition condition, and participants were more tired in the experimental than in the control conditions. These initial ndings suggest that neither inhibitory control nor physical and mental fatigue a ect the frequency of IFTs and IAMs.en
dc.format.extent18
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofPsychological Research
dc.rightsOpen
dc.subjectInvoluntary memories · Involuntary future thoughts · Autobiographical memory · Inhibition · Cognitive control · Mental time travel
dc.titleWhy are we not flooded by involuntary thoughts about the past and future? Testing the cognitive inhibition dependency hypothesisen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology and Sports Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionPsychology
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Research in Psychology and Sport Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionLearning, Memory and Thinking
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Published version
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-11-27
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1007/s00426-018-1120-6
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeOpen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record