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dc.contributor.authorWhiting, Mark
dc.contributor.authorNash, Avril
dc.contributor.authorKendall, Sally
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Sheila
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-18T14:05:37Z
dc.date.available2019-04-18T14:05:37Z
dc.date.issued2019-04-11
dc.identifier.citationWhiting , M , Nash , A , Kendall , S & Roberts , S 2019 , ' Enhancing resilience and self-efficacy in the parents of children with disabilities and complex health needs ' , Primary Health Care Research and Development , vol. 20 , no. e33 , pp. 1-7 . https://doi.org/10.1017/S1463423619000112
dc.identifier.issn1463-4236
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 16616757
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: b69fd069-01d5-491c-9a25-92f1ff8a19d3
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/21287
dc.description© The Author(s) 2019.
dc.description.abstractAim The principal aim of this study was to develop, pilot and evaluate an intervention intended to support the development of resilience and self-efficacy in parents of children with disabilities or complex health needs. Background Previous research has found that families often experience physical, social and emotional stress in the context of living with and caring for their disabled child. The literature indicates that a key factor in determining how well the parents of these children cope with their situation may be how resilient and self-efficacious they are. Methods A total of 16 parents of children with complex needs and disabilities were engaged in a series of guided conversations delivered during six contact visits with nurse co-researchers (community children’s nurses who had received an intensive three-day preparation programme). The conversations, which were supported with additional material that was designed specifically for use in the study, were based around four key themes: emotional coping, practical coping, support networks and ‘you and your child’. The impact of the intervention was evaluated using both qualitative and quantitative measures. Findings When interviewed, parents reported increased self-belief and self-confidence and indicated that they felt better supported and stronger as a result of the intervention. This was consistent with the quantitative evaluation which identified significant improvements on scores for active coping and self-blame on the brief COPE inventory scale and for empathy and understanding and self-acceptance on the TOPSE scale. Scores on the self-report distress thermometer demonstrated a significant reduction in self-reported distress scores at the end of the intervention period.en
dc.format.extent7
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofPrimary Health Care Research and Development
dc.rightsOpen
dc.subjectchildren, complex health needs, disability, parenting, resilience, self-efficacy
dc.titleEnhancing resilience and self-efficacy in the parents of children with disabilities and complex health needsen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Health and Social Work
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Research in Public Health and Community Care
dc.contributor.institutionHealth, Young People and Family Lives
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Nursing, Health and Wellbeing
dc.contributor.institutionFamily and Community Health
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.relation.schoolSchool of Health and Social Work
dc.description.versiontypeFinal Published version
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-04-11
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1017/S1463423619000112
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue
herts.rights.accesstypeOpen


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