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dc.contributor.authorMatar, Hazem
dc.contributor.authorTavares Pinhal, Andreia
dc.contributor.authorAmer, Nevine
dc.contributor.authorBarrett, Mark
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Elliot
dc.contributor.authorHughes, Philip
dc.contributor.authorLarner, Joanne
dc.contributor.authorChilcott, Robert
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-29T11:01:28Z
dc.date.available2019-07-29T11:01:28Z
dc.date.issued2019-09
dc.identifier.citationMatar , H , Tavares Pinhal , A , Amer , N , Barrett , M , Thomas , E , Hughes , P , Larner , J & Chilcott , R 2019 , ' Decontamination and Management of Contaminated Hair following a CBRN or HazMat Incident ' , Toxicological Sciences , pp. 269-279 . https://doi.org/10.1093/toxsci/kfz145
dc.identifier.issn1096-6080
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 17143740
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 8053d396-cc3e-4b89-8fa9-57f8ad474868
dc.identifier.otherPubMed: 31241158
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85083865083
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/21481
dc.description© The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology.
dc.description.abstractThis in vitro study evaluated the “triple protocol” of dry decontamination, the ladder pipe system (a method for gross decontamination), and technical decontamination for the decontamination of hair following chemical contamination. First, we assessed the efficacy of the 3 protocols, alone or in combination, on excised porcine skin and human hair contaminated with either methyl salicylate (MS), phorate (PHR), sodium fluoroacetate (SFA), or potassium cyanide (KCN). A second experiment investigated the residual hair contamination following decontamination with the triple protocol at different intervals postexposure. In a third experiment, hair decontaminated after exposure to MS or PHR was evaluated for off-gassing. Though skin decontamination was highly effective, a substantial proportion (20%–40%) of the lipophilic compounds (MS and PHR) remained within the hair. The more water-soluble contaminants (SFA and KCN) tended to form much smaller reservoirs within the hair. Interestingly, substantial off-gassing of MS, a medium volatility chemical, was detectable from triple-decontaminated hair up to 5 days postexposure. Overall, the decontamination strategies investigated were effective for the decontamination of skin, but less so for hair. These findings highlight the importance of contaminated hair serving as a source of potential secondary contamination by contact or inhalation. Therefore, consideration should be given to the removal of contaminated hair following exposure to toxic chemicals.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofToxicological Sciences
dc.titleDecontamination and Management of Contaminated Hair following a CBRN or HazMat Incidenten
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Life and Medical Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionToxicology
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Clinical and Pharmaceutical Sciences
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Research into Topical Drug Delivery and Toxicology
dc.contributor.institutionPharmaceutics
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.identifier.urlhttps://academic.oup.com/toxsci/article/171/1/269/5523251
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1093/toxsci/kfz145
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


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