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dc.contributor.authorYoung, Kathryn
dc.contributor.authorGodbold, Rosemary
dc.contributor.authorWood, Patricia
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-04T11:38:35Z
dc.date.available2019-09-04T11:38:35Z
dc.date.issued2019-07-01
dc.identifier.citationYoung , K , Godbold , R & Wood , P 2019 , ' Nurses’ experiences of learning to care in practice environments: A qualitative study ' , Nurse Education in Practice , vol. 38 , pp. 132-137 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nepr.2019.06.012
dc.identifier.issn1471-5953
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 17196745
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: 43a221f4-2478-43db-8385-46508379c601
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85068148295
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/21646
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Recent attention has been drawn to the absence of caring behaviours in health services globally, termed a “crisis of care” and policies are developing to address this shortfall. To obtain accounts of caring behaviours and attitudes in nursing practice and to identify how nurses manage student learning, we spoke to nurses and students in university and hospital locations across 2 NHS England Regions. Method: Using the principles of appreciative inquiry, we conducted focus groups with BSc and MSc pre-registration nursing students, mentors, link lecturers and practice educators (n = 69). Findings: Participants spoke powerfully about skilful, caring nursing practice, identifying plentiful examples of caring behaviours and attitudes. Four main themes emerged: “going the extra mile” (beyond routine policy, demanding commitment, flexibility and adaptation); time spent or invested (moderated by personal or organisational resources); caring as a personalised experience; communication practices and culture/role modelling. Discussion/conclusions: Positive caring attitudes and behaviours shown to patients, staff and work were highly valued. An ability to regulate and sustain an emotional connection with patients framed student learning. Observations of nurses who preserved caring practices amidst organisational pressures were frequently chosen by students as role models who “fight” inadequate or missed care. Theoretical links between caring and resilience are strengthened by these findings.en
dc.format.extent6
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofNurse Education in Practice
dc.subjectCaring
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectInterviews
dc.subjectNursing
dc.subjectPractice learning
dc.subjectNursing(all)
dc.subjectEducation
dc.titleNurses’ experiences of learning to care in practice environments: A qualitative studyen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Health and Social Work
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Nursing, Health and Wellbeing
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.date.embargoedUntil2020-06-21
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85068148295&partnerID=8YFLogxK
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.versionofrecordhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.nepr.2019.06.012
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


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