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dc.contributor.authorMoyal-Sharrock, Daniele
dc.contributor.authorSharrock, Peter
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-31T01:07:00Z
dc.date.available2019-10-31T01:07:00Z
dc.date.issued2019-10-01
dc.identifier.citationMoyal-Sharrock , D & Sharrock , P 2019 , ' D. H. Lawrence and the Truth of Literature ' , Philosophy and Literature , vol. 43 , no. 2 , pp. 271-286 . < https://muse.jhu.edu/article/737270 >
dc.identifier.issn0190-0013
dc.identifier.otherPURE: 13713811
dc.identifier.otherPURE UUID: ab527624-f3c3-4120-8bd9-835f940d6b8c
dc.identifier.otherScopus: 85076009088
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2299/21830
dc.description.abstractWe first clarify that what Lawrence means by truth is moral truth, and that the novel is for him the best vehicle to communicate with the “subtle interrelatedness” without which morality is merely moralism. We then examine his view that “art speech is the only truth” and his distinction between the artist and the man. We make this distinction with the help of F. R. Leavis’s understanding of the artist as great psychologist whose suppression of ego allows the power of reality-soaked language to guide the creative flow. This, according to both, is where art reclaims truth.en
dc.format.extent16
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofPhilosophy and Literature
dc.subjectLiterature
dc.subjectTruth
dc.subjectD. H. Lawrence
dc.subjectF. R. Leavis
dc.subjectT. S. Eliot
dc.titleD. H. Lawrence and the Truth of Literatureen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Humanities
dc.description.statusPeer reviewed
dc.identifier.urlhttps://muse.jhu.edu/article/737270
dc.identifier.urlhttps://muse.jhu.edu/article/737270
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
herts.preservation.rarelyaccessedtrue


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